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Anyone ever use Zero-Rust for painting the underbody, underside of body panels, wheel wells, etc.? I have seen a part painted in it and it had a nice finish and was not rock hard, so it would flex.

It ain't cheap.

http://zero-rust.com/
 

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Contributing Sr Motorhead
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I've used other industrial 'no-rust' paints before... They're pretty much all the same.

In fact, just last Summer I had my 16' open car hauling trailer sand blasted, then epoxy-primed. I topped that off with a spray paint job of an industrial no-rust paint made locally. We'll see how good it holds up to life outside in Cleveland weather! They were having a sale on 'Hunter Green' paint when I bought mine, so it was a tad under $30/gal, normally $50-60 depending on color.

Actually, a farm supply store might have good paints as well... They sell it for tractors and other farm impliments that spend their entire lives outside in the weather... I was planning to paint the trailer Ford Blue (think blue Ford tractors), but the green works, too. Not too many other trailers that color around here...

28 years ago when I was actively working on my car, AlphaCat, I had tried to use Rustoleum with a flattening agent. Didn't turn out well... and it took forever, and I mean months to cure/harden. Then a few years later, restoration vendors like Eastwood started coming out with the proper 'frame paint'. Then epoxy primers... The frame paint and epoxy primers do not have the UV inhibitors for things exposed to direct sunlight. I'm just sticking with a base of etching epoxy primer followed with a light coat of good old gloss black acrylic enamel with a flattening agent to get it to the proper duller sheen that should hold up for years...
 

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I've used other industrial 'no-rust' paints before... They're pretty much all the same.

...
Not only do I BEG to DIFFER - I have the experience and reviews to back it up!

I've been in this biz and hobby for over 35 year and have seen these products from the start. I've used most of them in that time and have had the time to compare them and even write up detailed reviews - on this page.

So-called Rust Paints come in a variety of formats. Some are "just" paints (pigment and solvent), some are 2-part epoxy (paint and hardener) and others are moisture-cured epoxy. Zero-Rust, Tremclad, Eastwoods Rust Encaplulator and Rustoleum all fall into the first category, which is why they can survice in a spray can format. That means they don't chemically cure and will never harden enough to form a durable barrier against moisture, which ultimately causes rust. The 2-part epoxy paints, which, although not described as "Rust Paints", do a good job of providing a barrier, but are not as durable as what I would call the "True Rust Paints". These "True Rust Paints" include POR15, Rust Bullet and a couple others that are "Moisture Cured Epoxies". They go on with a brush or gun and - in the presence of atmospheric moisture - cure to a very durable shell, impervious to rust, rock chips and other damage. I've had POR15 on many properly prepared surfaces for many years with excellent results. It has been my go-to product for years - even though they have never sent me any free product, not paid me to say that! I'm currently testing Rust Bullet in a variety of situations and have a good feeling about it thus far - as it has the same chemical make up as POR15.

That the OP said Zero Rust was not rock hard is somewhat telling. It's just pigment and has no way of hardening or becoming an effective barrier against moisture. Take a look at my site, or Google "E-tek Tests Rust Products" and you'll find a lot of posts I've done on the subject, with a lot of input from other guys in the hobby.

Hope that helps!
 

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Contributing Sr Motorhead
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What I meant was the 'paint-type' no rust paints like Rustoleum, XO Rust and such are just that - paints. The evaporating solvents leave microscopic pores in the coating.

Epoxy paints are different since there is actually a chemical reaction that causes the cure.

To be honest, the only time we've tried POR-15 was a brush-paint job on an engine, and it was a PITA to get a consistent coverage - it was like painting with molasses - and that was after we had thinned it by the maximum 5% with the proper reducer.
 

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What I meant was the 'paint-type' no rust paints like Rustoleum, XO Rust and such are just that - paints. The evaporating solvents leave microscopic pores in the coating.

Epoxy paints are different since there is actually a chemical reaction that causes the cure.

To be honest, the only time we've tried POR-15 was a brush-paint job on an engine, and it was a PITA to get a consistent coverage - it was like painting with molasses - and that was after we had thinned it by the maximum 5% with the proper reducer.
Ah yes - then we agree on the paint-types all being the same!

As for the POR15 - I find it so easy to brush on. I don't thin it, just trasfer some to another container and brush it on. It "self-levels" so the brush marks go away. The onl caveat is that it HAS to be applied to something it can "bite" to - rust is best (POR = Paint Over Rust), but well-sanded or etched metal is good too. Just don't try to apply it over new , or painted metal!

Cheers.
 

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Maybe that was our problem - the block/heads had paint on them and not a lot of rust.
 

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Actually, POR-15 (and the other similar paints) are not epoxy, they are urethane. And since we're on the topic, Bill Hirsch's Miracle Paint is also the same thing and is cheaper, cheapest I've found in the moisture cured urethanes. POR-15 and Hirsch are both based in NNJ, wonder if there is a story/connection there.

http://www.hirschauto.com/ (and they never sent me any free product either!)
 
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