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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

What do you guys think off when and engine with only 6000 km is using 1 liter of oil every 1000 km's ?

metric system....

6000 km = + - 3700 miles
1000 Km = 621 Miles

i dont know what to think off it actually :s

Greets !
 

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Let me guess was the engine built using Moly rings? Who built the engine? Overbored or just honed?

I built mine with Moly rings and I am having the same problem. At ~3500 miles on the clock I am still using a fair amount of oil. No smoke to speak of.

I should have known better and stuck with cast rings, even with a brand new .030" over professionally honed bores these damned moly rings don't want to seat.
 

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Bob you are right,the molly rings will go a million miles and not leave a top ring land, but are hard to seat, I always use cast rings and have had good luck, even in race engines.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well i did not rebuild the engine myself so i dont know what rings were used
The block has been bored over again (dont know what measure )

But the problem you are explaining seems like the most logical.....
Sucks if you know it was and expensive job....

Can this bad sealing also cause loss in HP ? (probally is )

Thanks already !
 

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I doubt that this is the problem but, you could pull the rocker covers to check the oil return holes for obstruction, worn valve guides and too much oil pressure can cause oil consumption.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Worn out materials cannot be the problem i think
Engine was rebuild a year and half ago, only 6000km's...
Will check it out though towcat

Best thing for me ( besides checking on your guys tips ) is to remove the engine and bring in to an engine builder...
Hope to god it is not gonna be to expensive and to serious to fix...

As i said, lot of oil usage and not much power in the block...
 

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I would run a quick compression test and just see what you cylinders are doing.....your plugs will tell you quite a bit too. (I agree on the moly rings in mine have never seated and she eats a fair amount of oil I'd say). Your loss in horsepower could be many things if not just perception? Have you gone through a very thorough tuning set up with a vacuum guage? That is a very good indicator of overall condition and which direction your "trouble" might be?

STOLEN from another site:

Vacuum gauge, the wonder tool

There is one tool that can tell so many things about an engine it’s simply amazing. Yes, it’s a vacuum gauge. And it must be the best kept secret to tuning in the world. We’ve walked around performance cars and visited the pits at professional drag races for years, seldom have we seen a vacuum gauge in use. A few cars have them like most BMWs at one time, but they were disguised as a fuel economy gauge. Besides, the vacuum gauge shouldn’t be in the dashboard it should be in the engine room. Every car and boat we’ve raced on an ongoing basis has had a vacuum gauge permanently installed on the engine. Not to be viewed while driving but to be viewed while dealing with the engine.

The engine is in fact an airpump. The better it pumps air, the better it runs. A vacuum gauge measures the difference in pressure between inside the intake manifold and the surrounding air, and therefore measure the effectiveness of this airpump. That means that the vacuum gauge can be used extensively both for diagnosing/troubleshooting and for tuning. A vacuum gauge will be mentioned many times in the tuning section on these pages.

So, if you don’t have a vacuum gauge, get one! You can do like us, have a beautiful AutoMeter vacuum gauge complete with mounting cup permanently fixed to your engine, or you can buy a cheap vacuum gauge as a testing tool and use on all your engines. Absolute accuracy is not critical, it’s more the relative movement that is important. And remember to plug it to manifold vacuum, not the ported vacuum port on the carburetor.

Diagnosing/trouble shooting
Fortunately a lot of different faults can be found with a vacuum gauge, because the behavior of the needle is different to most situations. Here are the 7 most common scenarios (engine idling and warm):

Steady needle, at 15-22: Engine in good condition. (An engine with long duration camshaft will have a lower vacuum and a less steady needle, maybe 10-15 with 1-2 “jerks”. That’s still an engine in good condition)
Steady needle, lower than normal: Ignition timing too late or vacuum leakage
Steady needle like in 1. but occasionally fluctuates at idle: Ignition miss or sticking valve
Steady needle like in 1. but drops regularly: Valves need adjustment or burnt valve
Floating needle, maybe in the area 10-20: Carb out of adjustment or vacuum leakage
Shaking needle, becomes worse as rpm increases: Ignition miss, blown head gasket
Shaking needle, becomes steady as rpm increases: Worn valve guides

If we’re driving and suddenly the engine behaves differently, then we first check the vacuum gauge, then we know where to start…

Tuning
Most of the tuning actions that we talk about in that section involves a vacuum gauge. While a vacuum gauge seldom can tell you the absolutely best ignition timing, it can get you close and save you a few test trips on the track. In the example in the Section Testing we test all the way from -12 to 3 degrees. Without a doubt a vacuum gauge could have narrowed that down, probably vacuum would drop noticeably below -10 and above 0, would have saved a few test runs. Mostly we adjust carburetor idle mixture and ignition timing simply by turning the screws until maximum vacuum is achieved. That’s a real good starting point.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi Badcat,

Thanks for the tip about the vacuum gauge ,
Will order one or buy one around here somewhere this week !
I can do some tuning etc myself
but i am still learning about engine modding and building

so to be honest i have no idea how to check the compression .....is it possible to do it yourself if you have never done it before ( with the right explanation offcourse )

Thanks !!
 
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