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Discussion Starter #1
I have been reading the CCOA judging sheets for the undercarriage but they leave me guessing. My car is from the Dearborn plant. Can yall tell me how the undercarriage should be painted or dressed out? Thanks
 

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Harvey, I know the underneath of your car was painted black by reading one of your threads, but does it have a rough texture on the undercarriage like it has undercoating under the black paint or is the black paint smooth on the undercarriage? John
 

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Harvey - the best answers will be on your car. As you disassemble, take lots of pictures. Clean areas and remove non-original paint to see what is underneath. Things like paint daubs, stripes and other assembly line markings will sometimes become visible as you clean or lightly sand.

The CCOA judging sheets aren't really intended to be a restoration guide. There is a Detailed Judging Guide that has a lot more information, but I've read that not everyone agrees with all of its contents. In any event, here is what it says for undercarriage:

SENIOR AND CONCOURS UNDERCARRIAGE

A) Undercoating: If undercoated, everything must be
covered with the exception of the Driveshaft, Transmission,
Rearend Housing, Exhaust Pipes and Muffler,
and Springs and Plates. Gas Tank may be fully
undercoated or may have undercoating overspray
around the leading (front) edge and two sides, but
must show some evidence of overspray.

B) Non-undercoated Cars: Undercarriage must be
primered with either Red Oxide, Dark Gray or Black.
Sound Deadener sprayed in the Tunnel area, feathe ring
outward towards the Rockers. (In the Concours
Class only: Floor pans should show signs of body
color over spray.) Rear Wheel Housing must be
blacked-out with Sound Deadener (Body color ove rspray
is acceptable over Sound Deadener). Front
Fender, topside and splash Guards may be blackedout.
Inner Fenders, wheel side, could show blending
of either Body color, Primer or Engine Compartment
color, with Sound Deadener over spray. Splash
Shields should show no signs of paint. Lower Pinch
Welds along Rocker Panel and Rear Quarter should
be painted Black on light-colored Cars (not needed on
dark colors).The Convertible Plate is either Black or
Natural (must be undercoated if car is undercoated).
 

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Technically, I beleive the underbelly "body" was painted with Slop grey (mix of used/not used extra paints adds up to grey). With Cosmoline added, this all becomes very black in appearance over the years. Frankly, I'd keep it all there if there are any plans at all to drive the car. It is a terrific base if the car is clean and mostly rust-free.

BUT, it is totally accepted in the car-show and sale world to use red primer. Red Oxide primer is great for hitting on the underbelly a few times. It can be painted over layers that you bungle/ding/scratch and many layers go on very easily. Having a lift to walk under and touch up areas makes it a real treat.

I painted the fender wells Black and then hit with undercoating spray, but many folks like to paint the inner fenders "body color" and then hit with with undercoating, especially the fronts of the front fenders and the splash areas. It gives you a lot of forgiveness with imperfections under there.

Tunnel sprayed black gives a great appearance and detail. Also, check out my pics of the junction areas in the front suspension/underbelly where you go from primered/slop grey to black in the front..especially at the lower A arm/shock tower bottom junction. There is a transition where you kind of "mix" the red and the black.

Another area for careful detail is the lower body pinch weld area. There is black out on the outer lower body adjacent to the pinch weld and the pinch weld itself. Flat Black paint. I didn't show this detail in the photobucket spread, unfortunately. There is an especially good amount of paint here in the rear panel, on the pinch area and the horizontal outer body area. Front fender lower body can get a touch too, but it tends to show if you're not careful. Use a long piece of cardboard for a guide and hold it along the line of body paint that is to remain colored and clean and spray-away.

The overspray on the underbelly is technically acheived when you're painter hits the lower body from a perfect angle with a good spray gun. What doesn't hit the lower body/pinch weld area hits your underbelly, and in a good booth it's gonna go all over the underside. If you're working the underside last, though, and detailing things under there, it's tough to keep the overspray look and then do your work, especially if you're touching up with red oxide primer last (what I did"..so you can get a rattle can and get the look if you can find a good match (silver is awfully easy!). Again, Cardboard sheild and spray away. It's a three minute job and adds a cool "touch" that everyone thinks makes it all look so concours ;)

Other little things that go a long way:

The correct Red and silver and grey on your chassis/suspension bolts (AMK products or WCCC)

The correct color on your leaf spring "ties" (those clamps that go around the leafs)-these are more bright steel color, the springs are more cast-grey)

Correct aluminum paint on the tranny and stamped steel paint on the tranny oil pan

Correct grey vs. Stampted steel paint on hand brake cable attachments and brackets

Correct low gloss black on brake splash sheilds

Correct Low gloss black on Brake backing plates, axle, and rear end

Correct Shiny Red Oxide (hit with clear after oxide) on front of rear end's pumpkin

Correct Bare metal cast color paint on suspension and steering components up front. Or use bare metal all cleaned and then oil or clearcoat (I had some painted and some just wire wheeled/cleaned and oiled up good

Oil up your leaf spriings and rear brackets and ubolts for protection. Even if they're painted, they will rust. And keep your rubber all treated with WD 40 for brightness and junctions between paint and rubber nice and clean and sharp.



Sheesh it goes on and on...just make it a driver and don't worry abou the underbelly ;) Did I mention that factory Cosmoline is great stuff!!??
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Brian what is factory cosmolina? And thanks much for all the information. I will be writing as much down as I can and trying to compile a real good information packet for both myself and the guy that is doing the body paint. I will drive this car but I want to start right. Won't be driven daily but when the occasion permits. were the front springs bare metal or painted black?
 

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From my learnings:

1968 Dearborn cars, various shades of slop gray.

1968 San Jose cars, Red Oxide. (that is the way I am supposed to do my 1968 GT/CS)
 

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Brian what is factory cosmolina? And thanks much for all the information. I will be writing as much down as I can and trying to compile a real good information packet for both myself and the guy that is doing the body paint. I will drive this car but I want to start right. Won't be driven daily but when the occasion permits. were the front springs bare metal or painted black?
Cosmoline-the udercoating goop. Why your car has a "textured" feel on the underbelly. It dries to a very hard shell after air exposure, but it stays goopy when kept enclosed in any compartment/cranny.

The Front springs were usually bare metal from the factory. It's good to paint them black, though. They rust really easily. You could also paint "natural" grey. Most folks do black semi gloss.
 

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I went the semi gloss black paint route for the front springs and I think they turned out good. Try out eastwood's underhood black semi gloss paint. I would suggest buying a case of 12 cans. You will be going through a lot of semi gloss black paint! I totally underestimated how much paint would be needed by more than half lol. I would also suggest a black primer first, just a very light coat first that covers 95% of the bare part, let that dry out over a couple days and then come back and hit it with the black semi gloss paint with about 4 even coverage coats over an afternoon. I noticed if I painted without the primer first the paint would chip easier than a part painted with a light coat of primer first.

http://www.eastwood.com/underhood-black-semi-gloss-aerosol-12-oz.html

 

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Discussion Starter #10
good tip thanks,
 

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I would also suggest picking up one these bad boys. It will save your finger tip!!! I find it gives you better control and aim when painting. Also your finger tip doesn't get shot with a blast of paint. Keeps hands clean. I bought mine at a NAPA type store. I believe it was around 10 bucks. It has been a very good investment thus far.

 

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Amen brother. Dearborn is slop gray, all the way.

From my learnings:

1968 Dearborn cars, various shades of slop gray.

1968 San Jose cars, Red Oxide. (that is the way I am supposed to do my 1968 GT/CS)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
ok now looking at the picture of Brians car, where would the slop grey start and finish? Also the pinch welds were painted black. Currently on my car they are glossy, detailed from the GoldenClassics I am sure, but the black goes all the way to the bottom of the Rocker Moldings? Is this to high?
 

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On my Dearborn - built, '69 R code vert, the only red oxide I found was on the inside of the front fenders, & on the 3rd member. I haven't found any trace of red oxide (xcept the 3rd member) on my Dearborn-built '67.

So in Brian's photo, if the car was built in Dearborn, then the red oxide you see would have been slop gray.
 

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ok now looking at the picture of Brians car, where would the slop grey start and finish? Also the pinch welds were painted black. Currently on my car they are glossy, detailed from the GoldenClassics I am sure, but the black goes all the way to the bottom of the Rocker Moldings? Is this to high?
You want the black out to be on the horizontal area of the rockers only..where it's not visible from the side, at all. The body color should be all you see if you crouch down just a bit and look straight on, so find the "curve" of the rocker/side on the body and where it starts to go up-that's the junction. It's a foggy line, not too sharp. Holding the cardboard away from the area lets the line be less sharp.

You get to worry about this a long time from now though.. ;) It was one of the very last things I did on my car..
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Not sure but I am thinking the painting of the underside will be done by the guy painting the outside of the car too? I am thinking that when I get the car back from paint and once I get caught up financially it will be about pulling the suspension and getting it right (painted and stuff) then piece by piece cleaning and painting or replacing and putting back on car. First step was disassembly of the car, then painting of the shell, then I am not really sure yet.
 

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Slop Grey vs SGB discussion here
.http://www.concoursmustang.com/forum/index.php?topic=2621.0
Note Cougar and Mustang going down the line together. I do not know if the call out was different for Cougar as it very well could have been. The Mustangs during this time frame were Semi Gloss Black. I just restored my 68 CJ Mustang bottom and it was Black when it left the factory.
Here are some cool assembly line pics you guys may enjoy.



 
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