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Discussion Starter #1
I have been searching everywhere and have been unable to find NOS shocks for this car. Sooo, What would be the best shocks for this car? What would be the closet in appearance to the AutoLite shocks? Thanks Harv I am still looking for NOS Autolite if anyone happens to run across them. I haven't even been able to find old junk ones!!
 

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I know that the springs are longer, but are you sure the shocks are different from Mustang, and how do you know. Just trying to learn!
 

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They are longer Towcat. About 2" inches longer. I used Mustang Konis and just added 2" with a double nut and threaded rod.
 

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Harvey, you might try contacting Bob Perkins (Mustang guru) of Perkins Restoration for NOS shocks. He's in Juneau,WI. Here's his link: www.perkinsrestoration.com/ (just click on "Contact Us" for phone #). If he happens to have NOS shocks for your car, be prepared to pay $$$$. John
 

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Thanks Puma, been calling and e-mailing everyone I can find. I realize they won't be cheap if I find them.
 

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Well no luck with Mr. Perkins. It was a good tip and he looked through his stuff but found nothing. Said a year or so back some one from New Jersey came in and bought all his Cougar stock. Anyone else with any ideas?
 

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Well no luck with Mr. Perkins. It was a good tip and he looked through his stuff but found nothing. Said a year or so back some one from New Jersey came in and bought all his Cougar stock. Anyone else with any ideas?
Bet that was Perogie. www.perogie.com, they may have something for you (and if they do it will be ridiculously expensive).
 

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Ya I was told by the last guy that if he did have them they would be 200 each. But he didn't have any for a cougar. Will keep my eyes and ears open and keep looking.
 

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I did some checking spent some money and time and mustang rear shocks will work. First I called WCCC and talked to Don. Don claims the shocks they sell fit and work just fine. No comment on actual KYB part numbers though. Next I emailed KYB tech support and here is a copy of my email and their reply.

Subject: Contact Technical Support 1967 Cougar shocks
I own a 1967 Mercury Cougar and want to replace shocks front and rear. As far as I can see KYB lists the same part numbers for rear shocks on 1967 Cougars and Mustangs, KYB PN KG5517. This is incorrect because cougars have longer rear leaf springs do to the longer wheel base necessitating shocks with longer travel. West Coast Classic Cougar sells KYB shocks they claim are the correct length though I question if they know what they are talking about. http://www.cougarpartscatalog.com/kg-5517.html They do not list the KYB part numbers so I can't prove what they are selling. I would guess over the years the correct rear shock has been superseded to a mustang shock leaving the correct shock just a memory. I want a performance oriented shock and I'm not looking for a smooth ride. Most shocks these days have soft bump and stiff rebound. Nice for a smooth ride but not optimal for overall handling. What are your recommendations?

Thanks
Bill


"The KG5517 will work very well as long as the vehicle is still near the original factory ride height. To verify your suspension travel versus our shock you could do a quick static height measurement.

· With all tires on the ground, measure from the center-line of the upper mounting down to the center-line of the lower mounting. This measurement should be somewhere near the middle of our shock travel to allow sufficient compression and rebound movement.
· KG5517 extended length is 17.87” and compressed is 10.91”

"You should be very pleased with the handling characteristics of our Gas-a-Just monotube shocks for your Cougar.

Thank you for choosing KYB.

Tech support"


I did some thinking and I figure the rear suspension travel on compression is most likely no different than on a Mustang. Only the full extension of the suspension would be longer on a Cougar. So IMO adding length to Mustang shocks to make the extended length longer is a bad idea because it would make the compressed length longer increasing the chance of bottoming out the shocks before hitting the bump stops. Bad for the shocks and the weak upper shock mounts. The one inch of lost extended length will never be a problem as long as your not doing a remake of streets of San Francisco.



I ended up ordering all four KYB Gas Adjust shocks from Amazon. I wanted to give WCCC my business but $200 plus shipping was more than I wanted to spend. Besides not knowing if they would even work correctly. Last weekend I installed the shocks. Not a fun job without a drive on hoist BTW. The shocks coming off were a set of four Sears Allstate shocks that were installed in 1969. I would guess these shocks were correct for the car? Worked well for over 40 years anyway. The old front shocks were about 3/16" of an inch longer than the KYB's when fully extended. I did not check compressed length because the KYB's are high PSI gas and almost impossible to compress to check. The old rear shocks were about one inch longer than the KYB's fully extended. Compressed length not checked same as above. The only problem I ran into was in the rear and unrelated to shock length. The bushings were not compressed enough when the nuts were run down to the stop, aka no more threads. From experience the bushings should be compressed enough so they expand to approximately the size of the washer or close to it. This was not possible without modification. I ended up adding thee 5/16" flat washers to the top stud and two 5/16" flat washers to the bottom stud before screwing the nuts on to get the correct bushing compression.


Final results after a 20 minute road test, these shocks work great. Decreased body roll and quicker steering response and only a slight increase in harshness. The front to rear shock balance seems good also. Well worth the $146 shipped.


Other thoughts I should have measured ride height before and after because I swear it sits higher. Enough to notice anyway. I know it took everything I had to compress the shocks trying to check compressed length.



Bill
 

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Thanks Bill for the report, I have been using that shock on all of my Cougars and they have worked great.
 

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Sounds great. I need to do all 4 of mine too. What part numbers were they? I called cjpony parts and just want to be sure of the part numbers. Thanks.
I did some checking spent some money and time and mustang rear shocks will work. First I called WCCC and talked to Don. Don claims the shocks they sell fit and work just fine. No comment on actual KYB part numbers though. Next I emailed KYB tech support and here is a copy of my email and their reply.

Subject: Contact Technical Support 1967 Cougar shocks
I own a 1967 Mercury Cougar and want to replace shocks front and rear. As far as I can see KYB lists the same part numbers for rear shocks on 1967 Cougars and Mustangs, KYB PN KG5517. This is incorrect because cougars have longer rear leaf springs do to the longer wheel base necessitating shocks with longer travel. West Coast Classic Cougar sells KYB shocks they claim are the correct length though I question if they know what they are talking about. http://www.cougarpartscatalog.com/kg-5517.html They do not list the KYB part numbers so I can't prove what they are selling. I would guess over the years the correct rear shock has been superseded to a mustang shock leaving the correct shock just a memory. I want a performance oriented shock and I'm not looking for a smooth ride. Most shocks these days have soft bump and stiff rebound. Nice for a smooth ride but not optimal for overall handling. What are your recommendations?

Thanks
Bill


"The KG5517 will work very well as long as the vehicle is still near the original factory ride height. To verify your suspension travel versus our shock you could do a quick static height measurement.

· With all tires on the ground, measure from the center-line of the upper mounting down to the center-line of the lower mounting. This measurement should be somewhere near the middle of our shock travel to allow sufficient compression and rebound movement.
· KG5517 extended length is 17.87” and compressed is 10.91”

"You should be very pleased with the handling characteristics of our Gas-a-Just monotube shocks for your Cougar.

Thank you for choosing KYB.

Tech support"


I did some thinking and I figure the rear suspension travel on compression is most likely no different than on a Mustang. Only the full extension of the suspension would be longer on a Cougar. So IMO adding length to Mustang shocks to make the extended length longer is a bad idea because it would make the compressed length longer increasing the chance of bottoming out the shocks before hitting the bump stops. Bad for the shocks and the weak upper shock mounts. The one inch of lost extended length will never be a problem as long as your not doing a remake of streets of San Francisco.



I ended up ordering all four KYB Gas Adjust shocks from Amazon. I wanted to give WCCC my business but $200 plus shipping was more than I wanted to spend. Besides not knowing if they would even work correctly. Last weekend I installed the shocks. Not a fun job without a drive on hoist BTW. The shocks coming off were a set of four Sears Allstate shocks that were installed in 1969. I would guess these shocks were correct for the car? Worked well for over 40 years anyway. The old front shocks were about 3/16" of an inch longer than the KYB's when fully extended. I did not check compressed length because the KYB's are high PSI gas and almost impossible to compress to check. The old rear shocks were about one inch longer than the KYB's fully extended. Compressed length not checked same as above. The only problem I ran into was in the rear and unrelated to shock length. The bushings were not compressed enough when the nuts were run down to the stop, aka no more threads. From experience the bushings should be compressed enough so they expand to approximately the size of the washer or close to it. This was not possible without modification. I ended up adding thee 5/16" flat washers to the top stud and two 5/16" flat washers to the bottom stud before screwing the nuts on to get the correct bushing compression.


Final results after a 20 minute road test, these shocks work great. Decreased body roll and quicker steering response and only a slight increase in harshness. The front to rear shock balance seems good also. Well worth the $146 shipped.


Other thoughts I should have measured ride height before and after because I swear it sits higher. Enough to notice anyway. I know it took everything I had to compress the shocks trying to check compressed length.



Bill
 

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Thanks Wonder wrench, after reading your report I think part of my spring wrenching will be to take the extensions off my Konis. They werent cheap!
 

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Sounds great. I need to do all 4 of mine too. What part numbers were they? I called cjpony parts and just want to be sure of the part numbers. Thanks.
PN's KG4517 front KG5517 rear.

Warning! the front shocks are the suspension stops so you will need to stop the upper control arm from moving downward. If you don't the springs could fly out plus the new shocks would be too short to install. Brake hose damage is also possible. A drive on rack would be the best way to get the job done. Ramps should work OK I would think. There may be a problem accessing the outer lower shock mounting nut with the wheels on. As long as the suspension has the weight of the car on it you should be safe. We do not have a drive on or ramps at work so I was forced to improvise. I wedged a hard wood block between the lower edge of the upper control arm and the frame before lifting the car on a pad lift. The shop manual shows using a special tool to support the upper arm. If I was going to do several sets of front shocks I would make the tool or customize some jack stands that could be bolted to the hubs just like a wheel.

In the rear again a drive on rack would be best. Having the rear up on ramps should work as well I would think. The rear seat must be removed to access the upper shock mounts. The sound deadening panel behind the seat must also be removed. Since I had did not have a drive on or ramps I ended up using two jack stands on the frame to lift the car high enough to get my fat ass under it. I used wooden blocks under the tires to keep the ride height close to stock. Getting the old shocks out was the easy part. The KYB shocks are high PSI gas and I found it impossible to compress the shocks enough to install them while laying under the car. So I used a floor jack on the lower shock mount plate to control the ride height with the wooden blocks removed. Remember I had to use 5/16 washers to get the correct bushing compression. I also found I could not keep the shock from spinning when tightening the top nut. A helper was the best option. Really with this job and its safety concerns I would have a helper with you during the complete job, front and rear.

Other thoughts: I would set aside enough time to complete this job before you even think about starting it. It took me over four hours to complete. These cars have to be one of the hardest cars ever made to install shocks on. Oh the shocks I got are silver and not white as most retailers picture them. I did some research and it looks like KYB has changed from white to silver. I kind of like the silver better anyway. What you will get? Depends on how old the sellers stock is I would guess.

Bill
 

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Bill, the front coil springs won't fall off with the shocks out, at least I have never seen that. You are correct that the shock acts as a suspension stop. What I usually do is this. Jack the car up, take off the wheel. Put the car on a jack stand. Then jack the lower control arm up so the shock is in a neutral position. Remove the lower bolts, and then release the jack slowly. Then remove the upper shock bolts and pull the shocks out the top. Reverse the process for install.
 

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KYB makes 2 different style shocks the softer GR-2 in silver and the gas-a-just in white. The white are the stiffer shock.

tech tip: The rear shocks can be difficult to remove as the body will turn while your inside turning the upper nut. They make a shock removal tool that looks like a funny socket. It works...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Has any one else had to add washer to make them fit? Could you possible use a die and cut a couple more threads in to them? I am talking about the rear shocks?
 

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I used (and like) the GR-2's which I think are now called Excel-G. 343146 for the front at $20.76 each and 343219 at $18.41 each at justsuspension.com. Like most things I buy, I shopped 'em. You might do a tiny bit better on these with free shipping on Amazon, looks close depending on what JS charges for shipping.

So sayeth the (cheap) ECI!
 
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