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I am wanting to learn how to weld sheet metal. What is a good machine to get? Maybe a 110 volt and argon sheild model. Thinking of trying to replace a rear frame rail.
 

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I purchase from Hobart a 110 volt HANDLER some 20 plus years ago, it was one of the very first 110 volt HANDLER units they produced.

I have argon gas hooked to it too. I have used it to death, sheet metal, frame material, and found it has worked great.

I welded all my frame work when I transformed the HUGE Buick 'X' frame over to late model aluminum Vette suspension. I have not had a single weld fail, period. I had never used a welder before, and it is very user friendly. Sure I did some test pieces, you should do the same, and I love my AUTO ADJUST helmet. Harbor Freight to be exact.

Miller and many other manufactures have great units out there, so DON'T be afraid of a 110 volt unit. Trust me. The duty cycle will not be an issue.

Dale in Indy
 

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Hobart, Lincoln, and Miller are all great welders. I have a Lincoln 140 amp and absolutely love it. I would say just make sure you get a name brand welder. If you get a cheapo, you will never be able to find parts for it if you need them. I know a couple of guys that have the cheapo type and they have all had issues with either the trigger or the feed setup. If you look on ebay you can find some really good deals. I found mine there brand new in the box for less than 400 bucks.

The part that is going to sting is buying the gas bottle. I was quoted 279 plus contents for a 2 foot tall bottle from Praxair and Airgas. I found this old guy out in the middle of nowhere that sells the bottle for 50, any size, so I got a 4 foot tall one.
 

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I bought a older craftsman 115v with a cart (1992 model) at a garage sale for $50 earlier this last fall that looks like it only got used a couple of times. Works great for sheet metal and exhaust. I wouldn't trust the weld on anything thicker then 1/4" as I don't think the penetration would be good enough. Ok..lets hear the jokes... Buying the Argon bottle was the expensive part. Do you know who made the welder for Craftsman in case I have to buy parts someday?
 

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I went with Harbor Freight. It arrived and was a POS. I couldn't even adjust the wire speed. I sent it back and ponied up for a Miller. Best thing I have ever done.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Looks like the Lincoln 140 Or the hobart 140 is a good choice. But about twice what i want to spend my money on. Then i got to buy all the other stuff to use it. (Helmet, gas) One thing about having a welder is i bet you will use it more than you think. Off to E-Bay
 

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Get good at it, TELL your neighbors/friends, and pick up some side money.

Have you checked for used ones on Ebay? Might just find one that was only used a few times.

I can't tell you the times I have used mine, it might sit for a week or two, then it's back to work.

I enjoy welding too. Love to hear the SIZZLE. Most important, YOU HAVE TO SEE WHAT YOUR DOING.

Dale in Indy
 

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Mig is definately the easiest to learn and to make a pretty weld with. Gas shielding is almost a must. Got mine 20 years ago. Clark 110v model. Had to replace the trigger handle a few years back for about $50 with a Tweko model. BTW, it came with an empty 24" tall bottle. Have exchanged it many a time.

Oxy/acetalene is the most versatile. With practice you can weld the thinnest strip to some heavy-duty stuff. The cutting tourch (hot-wrench) is pretty handy, too.

Arc (stick) welder (220V) will weld just about anything, rusty or not. Heat is an issue, so care must be taken.

I believe I paid $225.00 for my MIG 20 years ago, and I still have and use it.

Got my oxy/acetalene for free, including tanks, from my father-in-law after his dad passed away and he inherited it.

I have an old Lincoln 225amp stick welder I bought at an auction a few a few years ago for $90.00. Still using it.

They all have their place!
 

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I have used my mig welder from lincoln (bought it at lowes for like $400)....i put in a crossmember (welded in) for my tci front suspension...it was some thick stuff and had to hold and engine/suspension. I used my buddy's 220v matco mig welder. Turned the heat up and did multiple passes...the engine is in and the welds havent broke! I would recommend going to Lowes and asking around....window shopping never hurts


http://www.lowes.com/pd_256722-1703-K2480-1_0__?productId=1072945&Ntt=mig+welder&pl=1&currentURL=%2Fpl__0__s%3FNtt%3Dmig%2Bwelder

this is a great welder for the money....tool has already made its moneys worth
 

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I've got that exact one in my garage from Lowe's. Got it for under that price by using a $75 off coupon found in a USPS moving packet over a year ago. Someone on FTE, the Ford truck forum, told me about it.
 

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Lincoln 175, smallest 220V model, which shares my lift 220V circuit which shares the sewage injector pump circuit. My reasoning was that it was unlikey that I would weld, lift a car or poop at the same time. :buck:
 

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i have a 110 mig thats a lincoln rebaged matco, this thing has been great , i built my 80 bronco with it , i am usingit on my 64 and my uncle has been using to build his 50 plymouth. as my dad is a ex professional welder i pefer anything heavy to be done with an arc, as he breezes thru it like nothing
 
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