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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here is the shop manual diagrams for my 73 xr-7 2v type 3-14E. I am missing parts: 5, 6, and 7. I would like to install them and see if it improves performance; but I don't know what these part numbers are or where to get them. If they look familiar and you can help, I thank you in advance for your expertise.
 

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EGR valve, aka exhaust gas recirculation valve.

That is emissions stuff, started in 1973.
 

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EGR valve, aka exhaust gas recirculation valve.

That is emissions stuff, started in 1973.
Although it's true that EGR started in 73, the IMCO emission started in 1970. Very similar setup minus the EGR. The control valve is located under the dash in the "blue box". The check valves are not a part of 1970 and later IMCO.

You can probably find the check valves by just searching for "check valve" or "vacuum check valve" as many manufacturers used these.

The control valve may be hidden under the dash in 73 but I have never touched a late model Cougar. :)
 

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Technically the IMCO system started Nationally in 1968.

IMCO stands for Improved Combustion.

The blue box thing that you are thinking of began in 1970 on some Cougars was part of the Distributor Modulation system, also on 1972 cars. It also had a speed sensor inline on the speedometer cable.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
OK, I have identified the parts numbered 6 & 7 as spark delay valve and Check valve, respectively. The Normally Open Solenoid Valve (#5), I cannot find. It seems to be located on the bracket in the front of the driver side valve cover. I don't seem to have one. I was wondering if my car ever had this stuff. Does everyone else remember all these components on their factory set-up?

Any one have the part indicated as #5 they can post a picture of?
 

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Technically the IMCO system started Nationally in 1968.

IMCO stands for Improved Combustion.

The blue box thing that you are thinking of began in 1970 on some Cougars was part of the Distributor Modulation system, also on 1972 cars. It also had a speed sensor inline on the speedometer cable.
Ah, yes, you are right. I can keep only one bit of trivia in my head at a time. Anyway, out of curiosity I searched and found this bit of info:

From the Cougar website:

"Distributor modulator system was standard equipment on some 1970 Ford Mercury Lincoln vehicles. We see it only on the 1970 Mercury Cougar and Ford Mustangs with the M code 351-4V Cleveland engine and FMX automatic transmission.

The purpose of the distributor modulator system was to help reduce carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons. Sometimes it is referred to as the Dist-o-vac system. The basic premise of the system was to use carburetor venturi vacuum to reduce engine emissions. This was performed by controlling distributor spark advance. A retarded spark provides hotter combustion chamber and exhaust manifold temperatures that cause more complete burning of the fuel.

The three main components are the Electronic Control Module, Speed Sensor, and Thermal Switch.

Electronic Control Module is the black box which houses the PC board and solenoid valve. Ford part D0AF-9E718-S, in the manual it is described as having a black box and a blue cover, we also see them with black covers on the black box.

*Side note – There is also a white colored box along with black, blue, and white covers. This combination of boxes and lids make for 6 differently identified units for a range of other applications.

Speed Sensor this actually is often confused with a cruise control part. It mounts inline on a two piece speedometer cable, it also has a two wire plug coming out of it. Ford part number D0AF-9E731-A.

Thermal Switch this measures temperatures and only engages the modulator system on, at temperatures above 58°F. Ford part number D0AF—12A164-B.

For a 1970 Mercury Cougar or Ford Mustang the black module box will 'cut in' at speeds of approximately 23 mph and 'cut out' when speeds fall below 18 mph, provided that ambient temperatures are about 58°F.

There is other related wiring and vacuum lines involved that we will try and include. There were also two similar systems on the 1972 Mercury Cougars. TRS Transmission Regulated Spark and ESC Electronic Spark Control are the names of the two systems. As time and information presents itself, we will include that system in the future."
 

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Discussion Starter #8
dfwcatsclub, As you have taken the time to look some things up, I appreciate your efforts; I just don't see how any of the info you posted applies to my thread. The diagrams do not speak of the parts you outline, so it really does nothing to help answer the questions I ask in this thread.:bloated:

I looked in the location where #5 -the Normally Open Solenoid (NOS) is supposed to be and I find only a connector. So the NOS may have been removed. (I assume that the connector runs back to Item #9- the Ambient Temperature Switch, which apparently is located in the drivers front door pillar.
 
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