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Discussion Starter #1
When welding in new floors in a 67 what is the best way to support the car?should it be resting on the ground or should it be on stands under the frame?my brother has the 67 and if he gets off his butt and brings it over I will do it for him but wanted to know the best way first.Also when welding in front aprons is it a good idea to have the car on stands as well,when I did mine I seem to have lost some width on the front end and now I can't get the front two bolts in the fenders,it's also very close when I close the hood.suggestions anyone?

Thanks

Terry
 

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terry,
you wanna keep the car level at all times. DO NOT support it by jackstands cause the car flexes and they will be uneven if when lowered on the ground.But you can run a 4x4 beam down the lengths of the car and support it by jackstands that way. Or put a set of rims under the wheels .But if your starting from scratch n it has no suspension definately do the 4x4 beam along the length of the rocker panels on its edgeand that will keep the car level
thanks
pat
 

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terry
look under your rocker panels youll see a lip its right to the edge where its painted.Make sure the car is on a level ground and i recommend that the car be supported up on both sides not just 1 . cause again you wanna have the car level and not put any flex on anything when doing the floors
thanks
pat
 

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frameage

Unibody cars are notorious for getting out of square when welded or cut upon. Even years of use throw them out of square.
The fenders: Measure what you did. Undo what you did. Measure before you weld, then weld with a correction in mind.

The Floors: 4x4's are good ideas. I'd never heard of that. I always tack square steel stock to the frame rails like subframe connectors. But, keeping the car level is the most important thing. You don't want it to go wonky during the process (wonky = out of square) because then, things won't match up, doors won't shut properly, the car won't ever hook up right (if you race it) and it'll be screwed. entirely. and you'll have to start over.
bonchance!
 

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I am now in the process of straightening out my '70 convertible. When it is straight I will proceed with some subframe repair and floorboard repair.
What I did was support the car on its suspension. Then to make a long story short I marked of dimensions from my Chiltons manual onto fishing line with lead bobbers to act as plumbs. I hung these in the corresponding points from my diagram with magnets. I purchased an inexpensive laser level with a rotating base (one could be rented I suppose) and set it up under center of the car. Rotating the laser around and observing the difference between my marks and the beam I used a couple post jacks to manipulate the car into position until everything was straight.
This is the point I am at now. I plan on using the fishing line and bobs to mark the diagonal dimensions onto the floor of my garage and check them.
This process has worked well especially because of the uneven surface of the garage floor and the sagging my Michigan rustbucket is experiencing.
 

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One important thing to do when welding is to be sure the battery cables are both disconnected. Bulbs can burn out, tachometer can fry, turn signal relay coils can be toasted if current makes its way down the wrong path by accident. Obviously if the car is a stripped shell this is not an issue.

Also be aware the fuel line runs along the driver side of the body near where the floor pan attaches to the unit body. This is right in the area where it is convenient to weld in the new pan so be sure to remove the fuel line completely before using the plasma cutter or whiz wheel cutter.

I find it is convenient to use ramps under both front wheels and jack stands under both rear wheels to support the body in a level manner that applies the weight exactly as it would be if resting on all four wheels. Be sure to turn one ramp forward and one back so there is no danger of the car rolling off the ramps. Use a floor jack to install the ramps under the front wheels.
 

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Very good advice Royce.
I like to use ramps too. They're ultra stable, especially when you start wrenching and prying and all the other things.
One thing to add. If you don't disconnect the battery, in addition to the stuff Royce mentioned, you can have a battery with an internal short that will actually build up like a capacitor and explode. And ruin your day.
I love gonkladyche's idea of using a laser level to square the body! I'm going to have to run out and get one of those little suckers!
cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks to everyone who has replied to my question.I now have a lot of ideas to use when the time comes to weld in the floors for him.First off I have to wait until we get rid of all this snow and ice that has been dumped on us in the last 3 days.:angryfi:




Terry
 
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