Mercury Cougar Owners banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Trying to decide what exactly I will be doing to repair my passenger door post and had been leaning towards full replacement. After some research and making some calls, full replacement will be difficult at this point to say the least. I am considering replacing the lower portion only, but this would require cutting the door post/jamb at the red line in the pic below.

The damage incurred is mainly in the center and the bottom. I have decided against repair and bondo as there are cracks in the metal from it being stretched as well as some spot welds that are torn/popped, all at the bottom area.



Anyone see any issues with replacing the door jamb/post as noted above?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,577 Posts
Isn't that a seam/joint just above where you've marked? Guessing removing it at the original join point (what I am referring to) is way difficult then? I say if you cut it there and your welding skills are as good as they look to be, then you should be able to put it back together (well) no matter where you decide to section it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,950 Posts
I think that's just spot welded isn't it? YOu could get a spot weld cutter and go to town on that bad boy..... Whatcha got to replace it with? maybe you could re-work/massage it after you get it appart..? it may want to split/crack but you could mig that up brace it if need be I would think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Isn't that a seam/joint just above where you've marked? Guessing removing it at the original join point (what I am referring to) is way difficult then? I say if you cut it there and your welding skills are as good as they look to be, then you should be able to put it back together (well) no matter where you decide to section it.
Wish I had a picture of a closeup from the back side. That joint is the overlapping of the top section that includes the window post. The bottom section goes behind this and then completely up into the area where the window post, cowl, and door post meet, which means the piece I want to replace is sandwhiched up in there. I feel I would do more harm that good trying to get it out.

Side view


In this pic you can see the spot welds going up the inside of the upper jamb area:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I think that's just spot welded isn't it? YOu could get a spot weld cutter and go to town on that bad boy..... Whatcha got to replace it with? maybe you could re-work/massage it after you get it appart..? it may want to split/crack but you could mig that up brace it if need be I would think.
That was my initial plan, similar to the other sections I have replaced. Once I remove the sheet metal from the backside footwell area, I started to rethink it. There are some sections of the part I want to replace that are sandwhiched between two other parts/sheetmetal, which means there are some spot welds that are probably buried. Also, whomever did the body repair work after the door post was crushed did some welding on the lower section. They did good body work (not to be confused with sheet metal work!), but were horrible at welding.

I plan on replacing it with a door post out of a 68 mustang, assuming it is the same. Cascade Classics has a carcass in his yard that I am hoping to look at this weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,950 Posts
Gottcha - IDK if it 's the same or not - but it may be more usable than what you have maybe.....either way your looking at a fair amount of massaging huh! sectioning it may work out better...hard saying for sure. Good luck!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,577 Posts
My advice: Call Tom at KTLrestorations.com. Helluva nice guy and very happy to help. Give him a call.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
What has been done with old tin they will just cut out a section of the outer to access the inner structure to re weld , then just replace the patch . You can see the spot welds and just drill them out , you can remove the outer skin this way . It is a lot of work but if that pillar is off it will play heck in door alignment . To bad this 70 won't work I would zawsall it out .


Today we still just assemble this area with a heavy metal inner with the some bracing to the outer . I believe you could just drill out the spot welds and remove the outer just below its seam .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I will need to measure the window post at a minimum to verify dimensions. I just am uncertain as the the stability the post provides and don't want to compromise it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
My advice: Call Tom at KTLrestorations.com. Helluva nice guy and very happy to help. Give him a call.

Nice when a pro will spend a few minutes to help some one out , this was lifted from Bobs post .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
My advice: Call Tom at KTLrestorations.com. Helluva nice guy and very happy to help. Give him a call.

Nice when a pro will spend a few minutes to help some one out
No doubt, will definitely need to go that route be taking the saw to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
Brian get some conduit smash the ends flat and weld them in as bracing , Nothing will move when you place them at all critical points . Just look at it and see where any area will be lessened in strength .

You will see a lot of conduit used when I do the vert .


This kept all my door openings perfectly square

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,950 Posts
YEP - that's the technique guys who chop tops and section large pieces use to keep it all held together and not shift on them when they do it.....it's not a walk in the park no doubt...keeping your jamb alignment and the structural integrity at the pillars is paramount. Tom would be a good resource to kick that can down the alley with ideas......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
The areas,...arrow for impact point and line for the cut, look to be effective points for removal. Two concerns,...How badly did the rocker get rolled and to recall the amount of damage the dash panel had before removal?! Do you have the "new" dash panel to test fit? I'd think,....from this perspective, skin the pillar from where the hinge mount surface forms into the cowl, back to kick panel/door edge spot welds. Attach new pillar with a few tech screws, rehang the door and temporary in the dash panel. Check all gaps and fitment,..adjust with heat and a port-a-power,.....then weld. I think the biggest challenge will be rocker damage,...I love my Victor oxy/ace setup and my Port-a-Power,.....has made mole hills outta a few mountains!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Don't have a replacement dash right now and probably won't have it for a while either.

Got the replacement door post below from John at Cascade Classics.

Test fitting the door prior to completely welding in the replacement door post would be a good idea, I am uncertain though of how to temporary get it in and hold the weight of the door. I was planning on measuring distance between door mounting face from the opposite side. I will be measuring the rocker frame for any major discrepancies before install.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
Hydraulic jacks can work but you have to build a structure to push off of . This I used to push out the side of the A . The top bow spread the pressure across the entire length of cab .

 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top