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I have all wiring out of the car, since I/other owners have spliced/cut wires, and would like to solder them. Aside from connectors (screw/crimp types), what's the best technique to ensure conductivity (e.g. speaker wires cut accept multiple speakers)? I've played around with solder in the past, and maybe it's my technique, but the soldering tip never gets the soldered-to parts/wires hot enough to create that solid bond. Eric.
 

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well the solder iron needs to be of the wattage that gets hot enough for your wire.15w /30w etc.

yes it takes awhile but place iron under the wire to heat wire up , place solder wire on to of the wire so the heated solder melts down through the wire. any other way is called a cold solder solder which may not make a solid contact.

good luck. i am sure there are utube videos around showing proper soldering procedures.

jene
 

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Eric, an 8 Watt gun is way plenty for 14-16 guage wires. YOu don't have to overheat the wires to get it right! You don't ever want to use crimps if you can avoid it. The correct method is to "tin" the wires (which means dip the stripped ends in paste flux, put a blob of solder on the tip of the iron, touch the iron to the fluxed wire, and it will suck up the solder in a few seconds. It should look nice and shiny after you wipe it off. You don't have to heat the wire up much at all! If it's not very shiny it's a cold solder and you need to hold it to the iron a hair longer. Next, (after you have tinned both halves) you want to slip a little piece of heat shrink you have cut over the wires you are about to solder together, then again dip both tinned wires in flux hold them together (little tweezers or surgical clamps are awesome for this) with needle nose or something, and just as before you get a blob of solder on the tip, and touch it to the wires for a few seconds. Clean it up a bit, pull your heat shrink sleeve over the top and use your iron or a heat gun or bic lighter and heat it up to cover the joined wires. Voila! I guarantee you will have fool proof connections. The flux has an acid in it that acts as a cleanser to help the wires make a clean bond with the solder. It's best to clean the flux off with alcohol once the connection is made. The acid over time will tend to corrode the connection/wires if you don't. Another tip - to maintain you soldering iron in good condition, you need to dip it into the flux now then (while it's hot) to clean off the oxidation and crap on it, wipe it with a damp cloth to keep it shiny looking as well ( this shold be step 1 actually). This ensures you keep the surfaces and connections as free from oxidation as possible. Sorry about the long winded explanation.....but if ya want to do it right... ;>)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the feedback. Here is the UR to my electrical/vacuum photobucket: http://s891.photobucket.com/albums/ac111/ewojcieszak/Electrical%20and%20Vacuum/ . If you want me snap any other pics, just let me know. I need to go back to my schematics for a few connections. I noticed that several of the male/female metal connectors might have corrosion on them. Anything I can dip them in to strip off any corrosive layers without damaging the plastic? After that, should apply some of that jelly for the spark plug wires? ERic.
 

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They do make electrical contact cleaners that are plastic safe -- you can try that, a small pipe cleaner helps. Try no to strip off the tin/coating on the pins and connectors though. Unfortunately the plastics of the 60's tend to get brittle, so be ginger with them. When you put it back together use no-ox on all the connectors...I like the stuff that has ground up copper in it...helps to ensure good conductivity. You can find this stuff an electrical supply shops. I don't like using the silicone sealer stuff for plug wires personally - some stuff dries and it's a mother to pull the wires off later - which usually break of the connector at that point. Good quality wires/boots is all you need.
 

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I have all wiring out of the car, since I/other owners have spliced/cut wires, and would like to solder them. Aside from connectors (screw/crimp types), what's the best technique to ensure conductivity (e.g. speaker wires cut accept multiple speakers)? I've played around with solder in the past, and maybe it's my technique, but the soldering tip never gets the soldered-to parts/wires hot enough to create that solid bond. Eric.
I wanted to fix some wiring like you suggest. I also started out with a soldering iron (been using one for years). I stopped. The wire inside the insulation was corroded badly and would not accept solder. It was every wire in the loom, too. I tried several fluxes with very limited success.

I finally broke down and used crimp connectors.
 

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yeah, if the wire is heavily oxidized you will want to use a fine wire brush on it first. Then go about the procedures described. The problem with crimps --- especially cheap ones, is that most people use the wrong size ones for the wires they are working with, which either cuts the wires or doesn't make good contact, either of which sucks for hi draw circuits. They make the twist type connectors which are pretty nice, but much more expensive and hard to find. You do not want to use crimps under the hood period...to difficult to keep corrosion out.
 
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