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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I posted a question in the tech section about the "Best" hinge tool out there and got to thinking we should expand upon it a little more. I am going to be doing some how to vids on my 69 and want to show the best possible tools to use and what I am currently planning to use may in fact just be "good enough". If you have found a specialty tool (homemade and modified too) that really works well for our unique cars, share it here! One thing I have not found to date is a good puller for 68-73 caliper pistons. As you know, compressed air does not always cut it... Here is the blurb from the hinge thread I started.

What is the "Best" hinge tool for the early Mustang / Cougar?

The discontinued
Snap On S9608B S shaped, hinge wrench is the best tool I have ever found for removing 67-73 Cougar door hinges in place but someone was telling me about a Snap-on T handled ratcheting wrench that is the best yet. Anyone have first hand knowledge? Searching the Snap On site I found this, not sure if it is the tool that was referred to or not. Would like to do an informative video as this topic comes up often.
 

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Don,

Regarding the caliper piston problem.

Simple, it's all about hydraulics man!

Just as someone had suggested (and won the best idea contest for a free kit?) with the brake distribution block and/or prop valve, a grease gun will pop out stuck pistons like nobodies business! I had to do this with one of my cores to get the piston out. I had to "revise" the thread on the grease gun hose just a tad from 1/8" pipe to 3/8" fine thread - they are close/similar (but not to the point that it would not work with the regular zerk end) to get it to go into the caliper, but it worked great.

Regards,

Bob
 

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I agree that the grease gun method will work. It just makes too much of a mess for me. On my '67 T-Bird junkyard calipers, I was able to get all eight pistons free will a few clamps, WD-40 and a bike pump.
 

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I like that snap on T-Handle box end that is indexable - I can't tell you how many times I coulda used that thing! I should get one....

I haven't gotten around to making myself the "cat jack" I have been meaning to either. As most of you know there really isn't a good place to put a floor jack under the front end --- especially if you want to bring up the whole front. I just wanted to weld up a simple cross brace adaptor that would hit the frame rails and drop down far enough to make getting the jack under it easy. That way you aren't twisting anything or taking a chance on damaging anything.

Another good tool is the spring compressor that goes down through the shock mount! (easy to make, but a guy sells them on Ebay)
 

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I agree that the grease gun method will work. It just makes too much of a mess for me. On my '67 T-Bird junkyard calipers, I was able to get all eight pistons free will a few clamps, WD-40 and a bike pump.
Fair enough (and agreed it is messy), but when nothing else works...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Tom at KTL says "When removing your manual trans pilot bearing from the crankshaft, first fill the hole using a bar of soap then pound a shaft the same size as the hole inward until the pilot bushing pops out". Tom also adds you must use soap that is "Made In America".

 

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We use a hand-powered grease gun to adjust tension on the tracks of an M1A1 tank (and other tracked vehicles). A few pumps and the 16-ton track tightens enough to keep on the sprocket.

Back in the day before Eastwood sold spot welders, I modified a pair of vice-grips and the head of a body hammer to replicate the appearance of a spot weld. You could heat up the metal, clap the hammer head on the place where you wanted the "Weld" and strike it with a sledge. Worked beautifully.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Back in the day before Eastwood sold spot welders, I modified a pair of vice-grips and the head of a body hammer to replicate the appearance of a spot weld. You could heat up the metal, clap the hammer head on the place where you wanted the "Weld" and strike it with a sledge. Worked beautifully.
Good one! Nice way to replicate those apron to shock tower spot welds.
 

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Tom at KTL says "When removing your manual trans pilot bearing from the crankshaft, first fill the hole using a bar of soap then pound a shaft the same size as the hole inward until the pilot bushing pops out". Tom also adds you must use soap that is "Made In America".

Grease works for this too (what I have done), but bet soap would be a little less likely to squish out given its waxy consistency.
 

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Tom at KTL says "When removing your manual trans pilot bearing from the crankshaft, first fill the hole using a bar of soap then pound a shaft the same size as the hole inward until the pilot bushing pops out". Tom also adds you must use soap that is "Made In America".
I wonder if Irish Spring is made in USA - all I know is it works as noted above!
 

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Great topic, Don! It finally made a long time lurker like myself register so I could post my 2 cents worth. One thing I've noticed most people have never heard of, is the correct tool to get those pesky door striker screws out. Most people think they need a #4 Phillips to get them out, and sometimes those work, but most of the time they slip and twist out, ruining the screw in the process. Why are they such a problem? Because they are NOT a #4 Phillips. They are a #4 Posidriv. Similar, but totally different. If you use a #4 Posidriv socket on a socket wrench or even better, an impact gun, you'll never have a problem getting them off again and never strip out another screw.

For those of you that have never heard of Posidriv, here is the wiki page for them:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pozidrive#Pozidriv

And here's where you can buy one (shameless plug for Snap-On Tools)
http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item.asp?P65=&tool=&item_ID=78180&group_ID=20281&store=&dir=catalog
 

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I can't take credit for this one but I thought I'd share. On my 67 cast hinges there are half pins that go into the cast hinge body but not through. The pin was half sawn through. My machinist made a quick tool using a piece of 1/2 inch threaded rod. He tack welded the rod in line with and to the top of the worn out stop pin. He put a piece of 6 inch pipe over the rod, followed by a thick washer and a nut. Then he put the hinge in his vice and tightened the nut. Out comes the pin and no damage to the hinge. No hammers no heat.
 

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I made a tool to hold the spool centered in the diverter valve/distribution block so when you bleed brakes the spool stays centered.
Consists of a 7/16-20 (IIRC) bolt with the end ground to a point. Remove the switch, screw the tool in the block, lightly bottom the tool against the spool.

When removing a cam and you don't want to remove the lifters, pull the lifters up and use a spring loaded clothes pin to hold the lifters up so the cam can be removed.

Doing a leakdown test, you want each piston on TDC compression. Do this by rotating the engine a quarter turn and checking by firing order. Measure your balancer diameter, multiply times pi (3.1416) to get circumference. Cut a piece of masking tape the same length as the circumference. Divide the circumference into four and make three marks on the tape. Starting at the TDC mark, wrap the tape around the balancer. Now you can bring each cylinder up precisely to TDC by aligning me marks on the tape with the timing pointer.

Door spring tool=I welded 1/2" flat washers to the jaws of a pair of cheepie harbor freight vise-grips. Compress the spring in a shop vise, clamp the coils with the vise-grips, insert the spring, release.

I use a RC model airplane fuel fill bottle to prime carburetors on cars that have been sitting so long the fuel is evaporated. Simply fill the fuel bowls through the vent tubes.

A couple of aspirins in each cell of a dead battery MAY get you going.

Instead of hooking your battery maintainer to the battery, use a power tap to charge the battery through the cigarette lighter socket.

After washing your car use an air nozzle to blow the water out of the lower corners of the windshield/back glass to fight rust in these rust prone areas. Also, after driving in rain, raise the trunk lid and hood so water won't settle in rust prone areas.

Nasty radiator? Dump the old coolant, fill with water and a couple tablespoons Cascade automatic dishwashing detergent. Drive around a week or so (above freezing temps of course) and then drain/rinse/drain.

A dab of dielectric grease to bulb contacts will keep them free from moisture/corrosion and easy to remove. Also works great on molded connectors.

When aligning fenders and hoods, cut plastic washers from oil bottles so the serrations in the SEMS washers won't dig into your new paint. When everything is aligned, remove the washers and tighten the bolts.
 

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I made a tool to hold the spool centered in the diverter valve/distribution block so when you bleed brakes the spool stays centered.
Consists of a 7/16-20 (IIRC) bolt with the end ground to a point. Remove the switch, screw the tool in the block, lightly bottom the tool against the spool.

Doing a leakdown test, you want each piston on TDC compression. Do this by rotating the engine a quarter turn and checking by firing order. Measure your balancer diameter, multiply times pi (3.1416) to get circumference. Cut a piece of masking tape the same length as the circumference. Divide the circumference into four and make three marks on the tape. Starting at the TDC mark, wrap the tape around the balancer. Now you can bring each cylinder up precisely to TDC by aligning me marks on the tape with the timing pointer.
Excellent ideas Art! Two comments on what I left quoted from you.

At least on the 69/70 distribution block, the thread is 3/8-24 and a point won't do the trick, it has to be a rather thin post to go down through the smallish hole at the bottom of the threads for the switch. My thought was to take a allen head bolt and drill a small hole for a roll pin and tap one in, tool done. But then I found this (and decided my time was worth more so bought it). I think my take on its construction is a better one.

For putting cylinders at TDC for your reason or mine which is adjusting valves, I stack the firing order, write the first four on one line and the second four underneath the first line. Then put #1 at TDC (valves of 5th cylinder in firing order "rocking", one valve opening, one closing). Do that cylinder. Then rotate engine until 6th cylinder in firing order valves are rocking, do 2nd cylinder in firing order and so on. When you get to the 5th cylinder in the firing order, the first (#1) will be rocking, etc...

Love the RC gas bottle idea, the cig lighter charger, dielectric grease and the fender washers, so yeah pretty much all of them!
 

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Excellent ideas Art! Two comments on what I left quoted from you.


At least on the 69/70 distribution block, the thread is 3/8-24 and a point won't do the trick, it has to be a rather thin post to go down through the smallish hole at the bottom of the threads for the switch. My thought was to take a allen head bolt and drill a small hole for a roll pin and tap one in, tool done. But then I found this (and decided my time was worth more so bought it). I think my take on its construction is a better one.

For putting cylinders at TDC for your reason or mine which is adjusting valves, I stack the firing order, write the first four on one line and the second four underneath the first line. Then put #1 at TDC (valves of 5th cylinder in firing order "rocking", one valve opening, one closing). Do that cylinder. Then rotate engine until 6th cylinder in firing order valves are rocking, do 2nd cylinder in firing order and so on. When you get to the 5th cylinder in the firing order, the first (#1) will be rocking, etc...
Much easier (for me anyway) is to watch the valves open/close. When the intake fully opens and starts to close, set the exhaust. when the exhaust almost fully opens, set the intake.
 
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