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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever tried this? is it even possible? what affects would it have on an engine?

Teflon -polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is an ultra-modern, thermo-set, self-lubricating coating, chemically bonded to a phenolic-epoxy base so it’s highly resistant to scratches and abrasion. The finish is baked on, as the metal heats, its pores open allowing the Teflon component to penetrate. On high-wear areas, like slide rails, the coating will eventually wear away but the Teflon will still be embedded within the surface.
 

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My first thought is that the teflon would probably last only through the first (maybe second) firing of the cylinder. I may be wrong; maybe a quick check of the melting point of the "thermo-set" PTFE. That should give a good indicator of how long it would be before the teflon residue would be lining your muffler.


Maybe that's an idea for lowering backpressure?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was thinking the same thing, I wonder what the temperature is when the piston is fired. They have some other chemicals that provide the same properties at higher tempreatures...
 

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My first thought is that the teflon would probably last only through the first (maybe second) firing of the cylinder. I may be wrong; maybe a quick check of the melting point of the "thermo-set" PTFE. That should give a good indicator of how long it would be before the teflon residue would be lining your muffler.
X2
I remember adding Slick 50 to my Jeep Wagoneer and Olds Cutlass one year only to have to remove and clean the hydraulic lifters in both motors due to the residue build-up not allowing the lifters to function properly.
 

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Re: Teflon Coated Pistons

X3 on the properties of Teflon.

Although I can't vouch for the benefits of adding a metal enhancement to the pistons to reduce friction, I would recommend that you contact a company which specializes in metal enhancements, for their recommendations. There are many out there (ie: General Magnaplate. Armoloy, etc) whose products penetrate the substrate and do not change the dimensions of the part being coated. I use these products on occasion on moulds used for injection moulding, to aid in de-moulding parts made from tenacious thermoplastic materials (Urethanes, Polycarbonates, etc). I don't use PTFE (Teflon) coatings because it scratches too easily.

Just my $.02 Canadian

Larry
 

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There is something quite like PTFE on the skirts of KB hypereutectic pistons (or was is Sealed Power?). In any case this or something very much like this is already being done and is available in pistons.

Edit: Sealed Power, "Duroshield":

http://www.federalmogul.com/en/Afte...olutions/Products/Pistons/SealedPowerPistons/

Sealed Power DurOshield​
Skirt Coated Pistons

Broadest selection of graphite anti-friction coated pistons available

Our DurOshield skirt coat:
– Essentially eliminates scuffing — extends engine life
– Reduces friction — increases horsepower and improves fuel economy
– Helps prevent damage from inadequate lubrication, especially at start-up
– Improves cylinder sealing for less blow-by and more power

– Requires no increase in skirt clearance

They may say graphite, but if you feel the surface of one, I'd say the graphite is being carried by PTFE.
 

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Teflon is also used on household kitchen cooking pots/pans that get hotter than an engine's internal (oil) temperatures...

Not sure if how well it works or not, but I used Slick 50 in a couple of my street engines, and my car's gas mileage improved slightly (.5 - 1) so I'd ASSuME that the engine's internal friction was reduced a little bit...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was thinking the same thing about the cooking pans, but there not subject to the friction and constant explosion of a piston, especially at high RPM's. I know that eaton superchargers blades are coated with teflon, but superchargers are not subject to burning gasoline...

I'm sure Duroshield does the trick, but I'm trying to figure out how they did it...
 

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...I'm sure Duroshield does the trick, but I'm trying to figure out how they did it...
The trick is probably that the skirts do not see the combustion flame as the rings are between them and the flame.
 
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