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Discussion Starter #1
Tomorrow - actually today in about 12 hours I'm going to be swapping the carb and intake manifold and valve covers. Any last minute tips are going to be greatly appreciated! Also I don't know what to torque the bolts to, I could look it up but I want to see what your opinions are on it. It's an aluminum intake manifold to by the way, as are the valve covers. I'm thinking about replacing the thermostat when I'm doing all this. I might as well right? Also things like thread lock - do i use them? Anyway that's all - any tips or recommended products [gasket stuff whatever...] are awesome ok Thanks - Chad

Yet another confusing post by Chad Inman ;) Thanks guys
 

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About the only warning

About the only warning I can give you is to watch where the bolts go. If they go into the water passages , make sure you seal them with an appropriate thread sealer. Heck, just to be on the safe side, seal all of your bolt threads with some sort of sealer (but not locktite!)

Replacing the T-stat at this time is wise. You never know when you'll need one.

I usually spray my intake manifold-to-head gaskets with hi-tack sealer. If you care to, put a small schmear of silicone around any water passage holes on the gaskets.

Don't try to put any valley gaskets between the intake and block. They tend to squish out when you least expect them to. Just use silicone or you'll be chasing oil leaks forever.

Use factory torque settings for intake manifold bolts.
 

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Intake and carb swap

I agree with all the recommendations that cougar gave you, the only thing I do different is I don't use high tack. I smear a thin coat of high temp silicone around the water ports on the head and intake side of the gaskets and put a bead of silicone about a half inch tall along both valley ends and throw away the rubber. One quick thing to remember, make sure the surface is clean!!! I use a putty knife followed by a one sided razor blade scraper, followed by a sanding block, then a wipe down with laquer thinner. I have always had good results this way.
John
wvcat
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's all done now and looks/runs great!!! That carb works great! Cleaned up all my problems. But, when I took it all apart I found that there was no thermostat in there, being that the car ran fine before I decided not to put one in, and the thermostat I had was the correct one, but didn't lock in the way it should have. Is this bad-not having one in there? I live in mild-weathered San Jose, CA so I don't expect to have any real problems. - Chad
 

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Thermostat

Thermostats are required. The thermostat will not only maintain the correct engine temp, but it will also restrict the water flow. Believe it or not, you want a little restriction. If the coolant flow is too fast, it will go through the engine so fast it won't be able to pick up any heat from the engine. That is not a good thing. Even cars at the race track run either a thermostat or some sort of restrictor. So, for the sake of your engine, put in a thermostat. Also, your heater will work better! Remember, the spring side goes towards the engine!

Also, don't underestimate the proper coolant mix. Pure anti-freeze will not absorb heat as fast as the proper 50/50 mix. If you live in one of those climates that doesn't freeze, you can get by with a 25% coolant/antifreeze and 75% water.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So when I get ready to throw it in [there's this one bolt that is a pain in the ass!] because it doesn't lock should I try to make it stay put with some High-temp RTV?? I'll probably do this when I flush the radiator in a few months. So if anyone has anything to say about flushing radiators you can tell me in advance ;) How many gallons of fluid should I expect to come out? thanks - Chad
 
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