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Discussion Starter #1
Last week I finally got to put on my new inner/outer tie rods on and did a quick alignment till I get it in for a real one.anyway while it was up on jack stands I noticed that while the wheels are pointing straight I get 1 1/2 turns to the right before it locks and from straight I get 2 1/2 turns to the left before it locks.I did have the steering column out after it came back from the body shop as it had some primer over-spray on it.I gave it a fresh coat of paint and reinstalled it.I'm fairly sure that the steering coupler only lined up one way but I'm not certain.is this where I went wrong?Suggestions?

Terry
 

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You didn't have your steering wheel and sector centered before you adjusted the tie rods. You will have to drop your outer tie rods, turn steering to left count turns, then go right count turns, then set steering in the middle and adjust the tie rods in or out to fit spindles.
 

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This would be a good time to install the lower control arms because you will have to make a trip to the alignment shop anyway. You might check your strut rod bushings while you have the lower control arms out.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Ya I thought about that.they look good,not cracked or torn.I have a new set but couldn't get the nut off with my 750ft lb impact.What about alignment specs?has anyone tried these ones
<small><small><big>Please align to these specs “1967-1970 Mustang, Falcon & Cougar Performance Alignment with or without Shelby drop”.

These specifications are in order of importance.

1. NO more than .25 degrees difference between driver’s side and passenger’s side.

2. +2.0 to +3.5 degrees caster.

3. -.5 to 0 degrees camber. No positive camber, please. There is no problem having a slight variation from driver’s side to passenger’s side to account for the crown in the road.

4. 1/16" to 1/8” toe in

</big></small></small>
 

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Terry'
If you can find an old time Mom&Pops shop, they will know what to set everything to. Good luck
 

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Getting the camber right is critical. The alignment shop set my camber to +0.5 and +0.7. It felt really squirrelly over 45 MPH. I have it set to -0.2 on both sides and the car has never handled better.

Sorry doc, I have to disagree. Toe out can make your car wander at high speeds. From http://www.anewtoronto.com/wheel alignment.html

The toe angle identifies the direction of the tires compared to the centerline of the vehicle. Rear-wheel drive vehicle "pushes" the front tires, as they roll along the road, resistance causes some drag resulting in rearward movement of the suspension arms against their bushings. Most rear-wheel drive vehicles use positive toe to compensate for suspension movement.

Front-wheel drive vehicle "pulls" the vehicle, resulting in forward movement of the suspension arms against their bushings. Most front-wheel drive vehicles use negative toe to compensate for suspension movement.

Toe can also be used to alter a vehicle's handling traits. Increased toe-in will reduce oversteer, steady the car and enhance high-speed stability.

Increased toe-out will reduce understeer, free up the car, especially during initial turn-in while entering a corner.
 
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