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what exactly does a stall converter do and do i need on if i just want to be fast on streets not drag
 

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I'm a novice mechanic too, but hiere's my shot at an answer. The converter is like a centrifical pump that transfers the power from the engine (it bolts to the flywheel) to the shaft of the transmission. It lets the rotation of the engine crank be gently transferred to the wheels through the transmission. You have to have one with an AT. The stall is just the rpm's at which the converter "catches" and makes the car go.
 

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Hey outlaw,
Nice wording on the previous post.
A higher than stock stall converter raises the speed your engine runs at when it starts to move the car. Floor the gas and brake. See the engine speed? That's your stall speed.
From your engine recipe (260h, alum. intake w/4v, and headers) you shouldn't need one.
But, if the money is burning a hole in your pocket, I like the B&M holeshot series of converters.
 

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Outlaw, if you use Kraven's test, don't hold it for than a couple of seconds. Trans fluid temps get very hot very fast under those conditions. Also check your motor mounts before you try it..
And what ever you do,"be careful and be safe"

Bruce
 

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whoops

Yeah, Bruce is right.
That's a good way to "test" your engine mounts.
And a good way to heat up your fluid if you do it more than a few seconds.
But, you only need half a sec to do it. So, follow Bruce's warnings if you do.
:D
Thanks Bruce
 

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No problem. I mentioned because in 67 the gas peddle is connected to the carb with hard linkage, not cable. And we know what happens with hard linkage and bad motor mounts..."WEEEEEEEEE"

Bruce
 

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Also be VERY careful I broke both of my motor mounts doing checking mine a few months ago.
 

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in fact...

If you are going to get serious about your car's performance, think about some safety items to...
Consider:
solid mounts (less prone to break or turn to butter...plus, with an aftermarket cam like the 260h, you won't have your fillings rattled out!)
cable operated throttle (safer. doesn't bind. Off the shelf parts might even work {?})
A big ole trans cooler (good for helping you get away from the man and protects your investment on long hauls and in town. Helpful in burnout contests too)
An aftermarket ratchet shifter (kind of a googaw, but you can't smack it up into reverse and scatter the trannie without a concerted effort. I'm not sure if you can get one to fit your console if you have one)
Fire extinguisher (especially if you have a holley or demon! ;) and just for general purposes. get one that bolts to the floor or something)

just a thought or two:alien:
 

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You actually have to be on a chassis dyno to tell where your converter stalls. Generally the car will move or the brakes will be overcome or something will break earlier than the actual stall speed.

For example the 390GT has a stock converter rated at 1800 RPM. The car will move at 700 RPM with no brakes. The engine won't reach 1800 RPM with the wheels locked because it is below its peak torque curve.

A high stall speed aftermarket converter allows the engine to operate in its peak torque curve under acceleration. Torque converters often have an RPM rating for stall but this can be misleading. For example I purchased a TCI converter rated at 2500 RPM. Because my engine makes a lot of torque at lower than 2500 RPM it stalls higher than the manufacturer rating.

Best bet if you are buying an aftermarket converter is to talk to the tech department of the converter company and tell them everything pertinent about your car before ordering. Vehicle weight, engine displacement, gearing, camshaft and transmission type are all factors to be considered.
 
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