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Im looking at sandblasting my 72' and I was trying to figure out the best grit to use, Im able to get a hold of 60 grit for practically nothing but I didn't know if that would be to harsh on the metal

Im planning on sandblasting the whole car so I want to be sure of what to get, also trying to figure out what type of steel is on my car, what thickness ect.
 

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The best media to use is walnut shells or soda....anything else will tend to cause trouble. If you have a compressor capable to run a media blaster - why not just get a good DA sander a bunch of 36 grit pads and go to town? Blasting makes a friggin mess you won't believe - I'd hire it out personally. (A guy here does it for about 1200)
 

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I agree with what Mike (Bad69Cat) told you, sand blasting will create a profile that you will have to bury in primer to fill in the pits and it seems like you never get it all out of the car afterwards. Sand also creates heat and that would probably distort some of your sheet metal.
 

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I would use-and have used-soda or glass beads. I'd be concerned that the oil in walnut shells might cause problems down the road with paint. No matter what media you use, you'll never get it all out of the car unluss you dip it after blasting it. The good thing about soda is that it will wash right off with water.
 

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Unless you have lots of experience sandblasting don't attempt this!

Maybe sandblast the door jambs, underhood area and the trunk area. Sandblasting body panels "stress relieves" the steel, meaning it causes the metal to go back to flat sheets.

And you need at least a 10hp compressor for any kind of sustained blasting.

I would use a combination of chemical strip, D.A. with 80 grit 6" stickit paper and scotchbrite 4" mounted abrasive wheels.
 

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OOPs - I said 36 grit! YIKES! I just finnised may hardwood floors starting with that! LOL I should said 80 grit....go 60 if it seems to slow at first. Watch out for edges though...
 

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Hi all
On the subject of blasting a car
What tools/set up do you all recommend?
I have a Harbor freight tank system and a two tank Eastwood set up.
If I am using them right they both suck
 

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I soda blasted my 59 Cadillac and while it stripped the paint very easily, it did little to remove rust. I use 80 grit crushed glass in my blast cabinet and have had fantastic results with that type of media. I've also used an aircraft-grade aluminum oxide media on a '39 MG and it too is wonderful. No experience with walnut shells or sand though so I can't comment on that. I use my awesome 100 lb. Harbor Freight tank, but the aluminum oxide has destroyed the hose and deadman nozzle so I had to go buy new ones today.
 

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If I had to do my undercarriage all over again, or restore another Cougar in the future, I would have sent it out and had someone soda or media blasted it. Spent way to many long hours on my back.

Does soda blasting work at removing rubber undercoating?
 

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I'm impressed with a blasting media called "Black Beauty". Can be used with a small 1/8-3/32" nozzle (easy on your compressor). Very low silica and can be reused over and over
Sourced locally (B'ham) for $10.00/50#
 

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I would not sandblast. I've had areas sandblasted on automotive panels, but only to washout rust pockets so I could determine the extent of repair needed. Sandblasted panels will rust super fast,....like it will be noticeable within a day or three after. Before you can get all the media flushed and vacuumed out,...rust will start. Blasting also creates a whole lot of heat and if not done correctly will distort panels. I'm not down on media blasting,....just real spooky on sheet metal panels. There has been some talk and photos of Forum Members using Poly Carbide sanding wheels,.......with some good looking results! http://www.mercurycougar.net/forums/showthread.php?60881-Poly-Carbide-Abrasive-wheels
 

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If I had to do my undercarriage all over again, or restore another Cougar in the future, I would have sent it out and had someone soda or media blasted it. Spent way to many long hours on my back. Does soda blasting work at removing rubber undercoating?
I used silica sand to blast the understructure of my "high school Cat" back in the early 80's during the resto-mod work. The inside of my garage was cacooned with plastic, and the exterior of the car was wrapped with heavy cardboard, plastic, and duct tape. I rented a small industrial air compressor from the local rent-it shop that was basically a Ford 302 small block on a trailer that had (1) bank of cylinders converted to an air compressor. And, blasted away for a weekend. Looking back 26+ years, I would not do this again. Nor, would I recommend this appoach to anyone else. Blasting inside was a huge mess, and being young, dumb, and a little gung ho isn't the best approach either. The 3M dust masked being used probably wasn't protecting my lungs. If I were to blast the underside of another car, it would be done outside with use of a proper fresh air respirator.

In address to the undercoating question: Sandblasting did remove trace and/or film amounts of undercoating. Prior to blasting, the majority of the undercoating was removed by using a putty knife scraper and low heat from a propane torch. And, cardboard to protect the garage floor. This process of removing the undercoating is also quite messy, and will require plenty of fresh air, along with skin protection.
 

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Does soda blasting work at removing rubber undercoating?
Actually media blasters will use thin rubber sheets and duct tape to protect glass and sensitive areas from overspray damage. I'm sure an aggressive media will remove the undercoating,..with some effort. Just hope the pan can take the stress and whoever is doing the work has a good eye for detail and knows not to work one area too much. Otherwise it's a heat gun, propane torch and assorted scrapers or a commercial liquid stripping product, scrapers, eye protection, chem. gloves, respiratory protection........
 

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One of the guys on another thread is a fan of the poly-based grinding discs for fast paint removal - sounds like that is the best way to get 80% of it.....then just soda blast the rest.....it may lower the bill if they have less to do....the last quote I got for a total job was $1500, but that was 3 years ago. The undercoating is the tough part - if you use a media tough enough to cut it, it seems like it also eats to much metal as well. Plus I'd be willing to bet it will clog up any type of mechanical remover....yeah - heat and a scraper is about the only way I have found that cuts it, but I hope somebody has a better way! I have a vert that is going to need it all now....<sigh> not looking forward to it yet
 

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there is a hotrod shop close to my house they use plastic beads so it wont warp. a took an old cast iron toy from the 1920 that had been repainted they took the paint off but left its patina in place. they quoted me about 500 for my cougar
 
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