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Discussion Starter #1
While breaking in my 390 with a brand new RPM intake I noticed coolant leaking from the smooth surface just below the bypass hose fitting. Is this common? Can this be sealed somehow? I have never seem anything like this. Check out the pic. The spec just below the bypass hose is a pinhole size leak. There are a few more hidden behind the hose. All in the smooth surface.
 

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It may seal itself after a bit of heat cycles but you may need to tighten the clamps a hair. Is it leaking past the threads on the fittings I wonder...? You may want to put some sealant on the threads if they seep through. The Locktite Teflon is good to use anytime you have threaded fittings....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I thought it was leaking from the hose or threads but after looking closer it is leaking straight out of the smooth surface just below the fitting. There are pinholes in the aluminum.
 

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Yeah I'd return it if that's the case - I know sometimes rims will have that issue too.....a guy told me to coat the inside of the rim with clear before you have tires put on.....seems like good advice on porus things I suppose.
 

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Glyptol, may be a cheaper, easier faster solution....The same stuff they coat some of the engine internals with? Maybe....Just trying to think of a faster fix...
 

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Barsleak would probably stop it but who wants a bandaid on a new part......of course on my bike they actually tell you right in the manual to use it with every fluid change. It did leak some after I changed the water pump out and never added it - until I read the manual. It fixed it, even though I am not crazy about using it for fear of cloging up the rad
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I got in touch with a tech from edelbrock and he said he`s never heard of anything like this. He said send it to them and they will take a look at it. I hope that means they are
going to replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well here is an update on my intake. I did return it to Edelbrock and the tech said, while they were testing it, it was leaking bad from the bypass hose. Which was strange to me because it was not leaking at all from there while I was running the motor, as you can see from the picture I posted with the first posting on this thread. Just that small drip right below the bypass hose. He went on to say the bypass hole was ruined due to improper tube installation. I said to him there is no way that it was installed improperly. He disagreed but said they will fix the damage and send it back to me. Which they did. Okay, with all that being said, I got to thinking if it was leaking from the bypass tube as bad as he was saying there is no way they could see the small leak on the smooth surface below the bypass. I highly doubt that the small leak has been fixed. My question is, can I do what woodsnake suggests and apply glyptol on the inner thermostat housing area?
 

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If anything I would use some sort of epoxy. But, after saying that, I would be leery of trying to seal the porosity with anything because I would be worried about the sealing material flaking off after exposure to hot coolant.

I had a similar issue with an aluminum head on a Chevy S-10 4-clinder engine that I put back together a few years ago. It was leaking coolant near a couple of the spark plug holes due to porosity (I assumed). I sealed up the porosity with KW block seal and later drained and refilled the cooling system. The KW held for as long as the owner had the truck.
 

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Aluminum has a fairly active expansion compared to steel - so I don't know how well any coatings would up over time? What did they do to "repair" it then? If it's a small seepage type leak I bet the use of Barsleak wold take care of it.....I use it in my bike to help prevent the water pump from leaking - it's actually called for in the manual - evidently they know the seal is poorly designed - or was it intentional? IDK When I first replaced it, the thing leaked because I didn't use any.....then I read the manual and used it. So far - so good. When you install bolts and tubes that go into water jackets - it is a good practice to use that white PTFE paste on the threads. Loctite makes it among others......
 

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Discussion Starter #12
They welded the bypass hole shut to fix the alleged damage and re-drilled. I doubt they retested it to see if it was leaking from the smooth surface, like in the picture . It is just a small seepage leak. I was thinking barsleak too. Maybe a dab of JB weld or RTV then a small piece of aluminum cut to fit the smooth surface where it is leaking. Its such a small leak
I don`t think it will take much to cure it.
 

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If you can get at it with a propane torch - you could hit it with an aluma-weld stick. Very easy and should hold up well. I fixed a broken stud boss on my truck with that and it's held up for many years now. Nice thing is doesn't take a lot of heat and you can tap and thread it. I forgot about that stuff
 

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Have you re-installed to see if the leak is still there, you may have but I didn't see it. I would think if it is a pin hole leak on the flat mating surface that a thin coat of RVT on both sides of the gasket before installing the intake should seal pinhole leaks. Just my thought. JB weld can be used to seal leaks, I used it on an old an old carb that was leaking at the cap near where the secondaries are fead on a vacuum actuated secondaries carb. I think I would reserve the JB for larger problems and not paint in on to that beautifully clean engine.
 
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