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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I have a 69 base convertible with a rimblow steering wheel. It doesn't have power steering or power brakes. The lack of power steering requires a strong grip and a decent amount of force on the steering wheel, especially at very low speeds like when maneuvering in parking lots, which means I often end up accidentally blowing the horn. Just wondering what other people do, if anything, to stop this from happening. It's kind of embarrassing when I'm trying to turn the car and I keep honking.

What do you do on your rimblow?
 

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And that is the reason the rim-blows fell out of favor. It was a great idea unless you have to squeeze the wheel rim. Aftermarket steering wheels are an option if your not looking for authenticity. Unfortunately, I don't think there is much you can do with the wheel itself. You can always add power steering if its that much of an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't really want to change out the wheel. The car is not Concour worthy by any stretch and probably never will be, but I still don't want significant alterations to the looks of the car. I was thinking about adding power steering at some point, and possibly power brakes as well, which would make it more enjoyable. Those are options that were available as original equipment so I'm ok with that. The rimblow thing bugs me though... it's just embarrassing. I may just wind up mounting a small switch for the horn somewhere it wouldn't be very noticeable, like under the steering column right behind the wheel. Right now it's completely disconnected due to the rimblow switch failing. I was contemplating whether it's worth replacing it, which is why I was asking what others were doing.
 

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Hi everyone,

I have a 69 base convertible with a rimblow steering wheel. It doesn't have power steering or power brakes. The lack of power steering requires a strong grip and a decent amount of force on the steering wheel, especially at very low speeds like when maneuvering in parking lots, which means I often end up accidentally blowing the horn. Just wondering what other people do, if anything, to stop this from happening. It's kind of embarrassing when I'm trying to turn the car and I keep honking.

What do you do on your rimblow?
I had a similar problem with a low-mile 1970 XR7 351C-4V 4-speed car that I bought from the original owner.
He ordered it without PS or PB. I found a factory PS setup to install on it to make it driveable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I had a similar problem with a low-mile 1970 XR7 351C-4V 4-speed car that I bought from the original owner.
He ordered it without PS or PB. I found a factory PS setup to install on it to make it driveable.
Nice! I'd be interested in that... where did you come across that? I'm doing shocks and springs all the way around this year, maybe I'll make that next summer's project.
 

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Hi everyone,

The lack of power steering requires a strong grip and a decent amount of force on the steering wheel, especially at very low speeds like when maneuvering in parking lots, which means I often end up accidentally blowing the horn. Just wondering what other people do, if anything, to stop this from happening. It's kind of embarrassing when I'm trying to turn the car and I keep honking.
I have the same issue with my '70 XR7 Convertible. No PS. It was apparently a dealer demonstrator to show folks why they wanted to pay for power steering (car was built in October but not sold until June per the Marti report)

With a bit of practice I did figure out how to grip the wheel differently when parking, in such a way to still get enough leverage, but to nearly eliminate the honking when parking or slow speed maneuvering.
 

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My ‘70 Standard has a rim blow horn and PB, but not PS. I feel your pain on the parking honks. I did that a lot at first. I’ve developed an underhand grip so that I’m always grabbing the outside of the wheel and muscling it without touching the inside. I’ve also found that just a tiny bit of motion makes the steering much easier, so try to keep moving while turning, the best you can.
 

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Nice! I'd be interested in that... where did you come across that? I'm doing shocks and springs all the way around this year, maybe I'll make that next summer's project.
One of our local club members was parting out a '70 cat that had power steering.
Contact chockostang (chockostangclassicmustang.com) if you want to go with a factory setup.
Otherwise, if you do not have a tilt column or a big block with a stick, Summit and others sell the Borgeson power steering conversion box. It uses a hydraulic-powered steering box similar to the '71-73 setup.
Or there are EPAS (electric) systems designed for Mustangs but require an aftermarket column.
 
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