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Discussion Starter #1
:1zhelp: Hello everyone!
I'm about to remove my rear window on my -67.
How do I go about it? (never done this before...) :rolleyes:
Do I press it out from the inside, or do I pry it out from the outside, or do I need any special tools for this?

Oh, and the window should be in one piece, so I can put it back again...:D

Probably, many of you guys (and girls) have done this before and can give me some pointers.

Thanks in advance!
/Ulf
 

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If there is a rubber around it, just cut it over the entire lenght, and order a new one. It is so easy, you can allmost get it out yourself, but be certain, and ask a friend who is slightly pushing from the inside while you grab it on the outside. BTW, anew rubber costs less then a new glass.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have already ordered a wheatherstrip-kit (front and rear window and everything else) so I might just as well cut the old one to pieces.
Why didn't I think of that?:rolleyes:

It's still a while before I have to put the window back, but I might as well ask right now. Do I need any special tools för reinstalling it with a fresh new weatherstrip? How difficult is it?
 

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It's really easy to install. Be sure to install your new headliner (if needed) first. You will need to replace all the clips that hold the chrome molding in place before installing the glass. Use the instructions in the Ford / Mercury factory shop manual.
 

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Deja Vu!

Hey Royce, on another thread, I was asking similar questions regarding the replacement of the rear window (though my post was immeasurably more a a whine-n-rant than this one is! ;) )

I was encouraged to NOT use any "goop" to seal around the rubber. Would that also be your recommendation? It just seems somehow "wrong" to not use some kind of sealer around the rubber - though, Like my idol Tim Taylor, I tend to lean towards "well if that's good, this will be BETTER" more often than not...so that's why independent thinking and different points of view are a good thing...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yea, Deja Vu allright.
Other thread
Didn't see that thread... Now I've looked it up and read it!
Maybee I should have read that one before posting this... Too Late! :D

I had a lot of "goop"/"gunk" around the rubber and I also had rust under the "goop" ... therefore I'm probably gona try without "goop" to begin with.

How about this one: What if I broke one or more of the pins that you put the clips on...(don't remember if I just broke one or if I broke more of them getting all the hardened "gunk" out...)
Will I still be able to get the chrome-moldings to stay properly attached? Or do I need to replace the pins.
(I think it was only one that broke of...)
 

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Yo Swedish,

based on my limited experience with window mouldings, I would venture to say that the moulding would stay ON, but I don't think you'd be happy with the results...though I guess it depends to some degree on where on the moulding the pin is missing. (GAWD I love answering questions with "well, it depends..." :lol2:

I think you can get the pins still, though they would likely need to be welded back on...I do know the clips are still readily available.

I suspect I have some grunge to clean out under the rubber in my rear window channel...so I will do that first - but I REALLY don't EVER want to have to work on the window again...so unless someone tells me it's a big mistake, I'll prolly put some in there anyway.

I do know the *coff, coff* "professional" that did it last time used some goop that really hasn't FULLY hardened to this very day - that would seem like "good goop" to have...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My guess is that adding sealant aroung the rubber keeps the water that finds its way in trapped and causing RUST... but I can be wrong...

Guess I'll try to replace the pin then.
I dont have to worry about reusing the old clips since they were rusted up beyond recognition... I recovered several halfs while removing old gunk...:D
 

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there are also pins that you can screw in a drilled hole, it is more efficient to do so, cause it's much easier to drill ahole in the correct place then to weld it.
I used wax IN the new rubber, it avert water, and the instalation goes smoothly. You know, the wax they use on the inner side of the door. It penetrates good in small cracks.
Good luck.
 

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You have to fill in the area where the clips are completely with acrylic caulk (black) right before installing the chrome trim or the window will leak. Do not use silicone RTV!
 

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Royce, why will it leak where the clips go? Also, do you put the caulk on first then install window or after install? thanks, Scott
 

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Discussion Starter #12
How did they do it from the factory, did they fill the space around the weatherstrip?

I'm a little concerned with trapping water under it all...
 

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You are supposed to put a small bead of sealant in the channel where the glass goes. The space around the weatherstrip was entirely filled from the factory. It will leak otherwise because the body seams are not smooth and the headliner material is wrapped in there too making it impossible to seal properly unless all the goo is installed.
 

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*dancin'* Go Roy-oyce, Go Roy-oyce

You da man!

I thought I remembered in the manual something about sealing the glass, and using a string to pull the inner "lip" of the seal into the car...though on the other thread, a mythical "window installation tool" was mentioned...so I may have to go in search of the Grail before I do mine (I hope the french don't throw cows at me).

Guess maybe I oughta take down the manual once in a while, if for nothing else than to dust it off! :lol:

(p.s. Apologies to Monty Python for the cow reference :eek: )
 

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I am replacing the headliner in my R-code this weekend so I will take pictures and do a write up on the process for the Mercury Cougar. net forum. Got all my parts from John Benoit (Cascade Classics) today!
 

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Wow, Royce, I tell ya, if I wasn't already married......... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
I removed my rear window yesterday.
No problems at all. I followed 428cj's recomendation and cut the rubber from the outside around the glass and lifted it out. Piece of cake!:D
Now I see how it would be difficult to get it sealing properly without filling up the area around the rubber. Just like you said Royce!
Will be looking forward to some info on the headliner-installation since I'll be doing that myself as soon as I get my new one.
 

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About 12 years ago, per the instructions of a friend and cougar resto freak, I sealed off my rear window with silicone caulk.
What I suggested to the tall one was to not use goop below the trim, but to leave the gasket intact and goopless. Use the silicone on the trim to seal off the window entirely. That way, the rubber acts as a cushy piece for the glass and you don't have the hardening of the rubber gasket over time because of the goo. And you have a completely sealed area.
I'm not a resto freak, so I didn't mind the silicone. It would begin to white out about every 2 years or so, and I would peel it off and do it again. And now that I have my car down to the basecoat and nearly ready to paint, I can see that it worked well. because the rust converter I used way back when is still there and my window area hasn't rusted out. The gasket is still as flexible as new.
Not that I'm refuting Royce's advice, or the instructions in the manual. I just have my own way of doing it that works for me. Besides, screw FoMoCo. They're responsible for my front suspension and seating postion sucking, so I don't trust them that much on other basic things like sealing windows.
And a lot of cougar owners might consider "filling" the depression at the lower corners of the rear glass with silicone to help the water keep going on down to the ground and not pool up or find a place to soak in.
The trim removal tool is a godsend too. Very handy for not trashing trim.:alien:
 
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