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hey guys im new here , so im not sure if this is the right place to post this, i tried doing a search and while there is a lot of information im still lost. just took on this project of making my girls cougar road worthy, among other things the alternator is not charging , its a new alternator , it also has a new battery and a new voltage regulator, at idle im looking at 12.4 volts and if i really get on the throttle i can maybe reach 12.9 volts measured with a volt meter at the battery.

what am i over looking. i cant figure out if the wiring is right although ive looked at the wiring diagram for a ^8 mustang and it all looks good. im a little frustrated at this point and read some people are putting internal regulated alternators from ford taurus's will this cure my problem if i go this route?

any info would be greatly appreciated
 

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You should be seeing better voltage than that (14ish) - there are known issues with Chinese made regulators, but I would also check that you have good block to body grounds since the stock ones suck,,,
 

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With an ohmmeter check from alternator case to battery negative post. There should be near 0 ohms resistance. Also do the same from the regulator metal body to the battery negative. If both OK pull the connector out of the regulator and look into the contacts. If they looked corroded/powdery mix up some baking soda in water and dunk the connector into the solution shaking every minute until the contacts start looking clean. I've also cut a sliver off of an emery board (fingernails) and slid it in and out to clean the contacts and then blow out.
 

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You can also test if it´s the regulatro or the alternator that is at fault, put the positive pin from the voltmeter on the positive post on the alternator, and the negative on the negative post on the battery, if you get the same reading, it´s the alternator, if you get much higher reading (14.4 or above), it´s the regulator that´s at fault
 

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easy test, unplug the regulator, have a volt meter hooked up to battery, jump the a and f terminals at the plug you unpluged from the regulator, only for long enough to see if voltage starts climbing. If voltage climbs alternator is good and so is field wire, check your regulator plug, the I (ignition) terminal should have battery voltage with key on. The a (alternator) and B (battery) should have voltage all the time. The F (field) check with ohm meter from regulator plug to f terminal on alternator, do the same for S (stator) check from regulator to back of alternator. Hope this is understandable.
 
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