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i could have sent my car to a body shop and missed out on the experience of doing all of the work my self, i have time and its my project so i should do the work. i hand sanded my entire 74 XR-7 got it primered, but still got little swirls and stuff that show through, only put on 3 coats, and sanding stages were 60g then 180g then 800g then 1000g, i thought that would be fine enough to blend all imperfections out but is was wrong lol, any ideas?
 

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Pictures would help. Other than that the only thing that jumps out at me is 180 to 800 is too big a step in grits.
 

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i could have sent my car to a body shop and missed out on the experience of doing all of the work my self, i have time and its my project so i should do the work. i hand sanded my entire 74 XR-7 got it primered, but still got little swirls and stuff that show through, only put on 3 coats, and sanding stages were 60g then 180g then 800g then 1000g, i thought that would be fine enough to blend all imperfections out but is was wrong lol, any ideas?
Need more information, was the swirls in the primer or finish coat, did you use a DA for sanding or do it by hand,what kind of paint, such as , base/clear or single stage ?
 

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This may sound silly, but the first car I painted I did such with advise from a real painter, well when finished I could see swirls too. I called my painter friend, and he said, "Does your garage have FLUORESCENT LIGHTS?" I said, YES, He said TAKE IT OUT OF THE GARAGE, AND INTO THE SUN LIGHT, so I did and they disappeared. Fluorescent lights show every little blem, and in natural light they did disappear.

I like others would need more info regarding sanding method and grits used.

I wish you well,

Dale in Indy
 

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The 60 grit would be used as a rough in for body fillers. The 180 grit could be used as a blocking/feathering in for body fillers, before the application an epoxy primer. Then start with 220 grit, working toward finer 300+ when blocking the primers. Hope this is what you meant when using the heavy grit sand papers!
 

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I'm a first timer as well and am using high build 2K primer after bodywork and like the way it fills in stray scatches that I couln't see. I used 80 grit on the DA and thought the finer grits would take care of the 80 scratches on the outer edges of the repairs, but was wrong. The high build sands easily as well.
 

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I envy you guys that have the time and equipment to do your own paint. The main body of the car I have to farm out. I don't have any Idea about paint and right now dont have the time to learn so I am letting a pro do that part. I will paint the small stuff and take care of the mechanical stuff. Would be pretty cool to look at a great paint job and be able to say "ya I did that!" Good luck.
 

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First off nothing wrong with trying. I was too scared to screw up my car before I went to school and 10 years later I still have someone else's work on my car. Still bugs me. Will finally paint it in the next couple years though.
All primers are different but in general the better quality ones will fill and hide better than cheaper ones. Not sure what you used.
Type of gun and size if tip also are important. Too small of a tip and three coats might not be enough primer. Too big of tip also could create problems.
Not to mention sanding technique itself or spraying technique.
Sorry to not really answer your question but like someone else said pictures would help and a bit more info too.
Oh and I agree that the 180-800 was too big of jump. I personally like something along the lines of 80-180-320 first.
 

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I agree, the jump form 180-800 is too drastic. Also 800 and 1000 are WAY TOO FINE if you want the paint to stick.

I wet sanded the last few coats of high build primer with 600 before shooting the sealer, then color, then clear.

1000 is best used for the first cut on the clear if you have heavy orange peel or a run you need to smooth out before going to 1500, 2000 and even 3000 if you're THAT patient.
 

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Need more information, was the swirls in the primer or finish coat, did you use a DA for sanding or do it by hand,what kind of paint, such as , base/clear or single stage ?
Still no answer from 74Xr7302 Whats up?
 

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At least you are sanding in the garage, when I wet sanded my hood scoop, my wife really wasn't paying attention to what I was doing...until she heard the water running in the bathroom...then she came in to find me wet sanding it in the bath tub..."note to self,... when wet sanding black paint, do it outside"... it left a ring around the tub that took me a 1/2 hour to clean up. She got over it.
 

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In general....

Sand body work with the following (Guidecoat in between each grit to ensure you have removed all of the previous grit's scratches!!)
- 36 grit for ROUGH cutting
- 80 grit for shaping and smoothing
- FINISH with 150 or 180 grit. This is primarily only used to remove the 80 grit scratches.


Primering
- Sand the surrounding repair areas with 320 to capture overspray from your primer.
- ROUGH cut primer with 220 grit if it has heavy texture, or if you know that it's still gonna be pretty gnarly.
- FINISH primer sanding with recommended grit for whatever you are using next.........

- If you are going to re-prime, 220 is fine to primer over.
- If you are going to seal then paint, 400 is generally fine
- If you are going to paint without sealing, 600 is generally fine.

All grits mentioned above are when dry sanding. I prefer dry sanding now after years of wet sanding. It's easier on the shoes.



It is important to not make too drastic of a jump between sanding grits. The purpose of stepping it down is scratch refinement. Without making sure that each grit is totally removed, you will see the original, heavy grits showing through when you finish. These sound like the "swirls" the OP mentioned.
 

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Yes, exactly.
Go back, guide coat it, and sand it with 400 or so, then leave it at that. As long as it's straight, you're ready for paint.
 
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