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My name is Mark and I recently purchased a 1967 Cougar with a 289 here in northern California. 132k miles on it and the body is in pretty good shape. Paint looks like someone put clear over the original white and its peeling. I want to rebuild/replace the 289 since i've since found zero compression on cylinders 2,3, and 6. The other holes were 75-115 psi. I've never completely rebuilt an engine and I think I would rather replace it if I can find something at a reasonable price. I've been restoring/resurrecting older 40's and 50's Plymouths and Willys cars for the last few years, but, wanted something "newer". I'm not looking for something fast really, just looking for a driver from this era. All advice is welcome.

I looked closer at the engine today. It appears to be a 302 from the early 70's. I don't know if thats good or bad, but, it's not the original engine as I thought. I attached a pic of the casting numbers.
 

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132k is getting up there for a V8 from that era, but if you just need to get it running maybe a valve adjustment would help the compression? Maybe some of your lifters are refusing to pump up? Might not be as serious as a full rebuild, at least not right away.

Looks like a fun project. Good luck!
 

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Looks like the block is from a 302 cast in April 1972. I would be looking at crate motors since the one in the car isn't original or even the right vintage or displacement. Summit Racing or Jegs each have a wide selection that would work for you.
 

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My name is Mark and I recently purchased a 1967 Cougar with a 289 here in northern California. 132k miles on it and the body is in pretty good shape. Paint looks like someone put clear over the original white and its peeling. I want to rebuild/replace the 289 since i've since found zero compression on cylinders 2,3, and 6. The other holes were 75-115 psi. I've never completely rebuilt an engine and I think I would rather replace it if I can find something at a reasonable price. I've been restoring/resurrecting older 40's and 50's Plymouths and Willys cars for the last few years, but, wanted something "newer". I'm not looking for something fast really, just looking for a driver from this era. All advice is welcome.

I looked closer at the engine today. It appears to be a 302 from the early 70's. I don't know if thats good or bad, but, it's not the original engine as I thought. I attached a pic of the casting numbers.
If it were mine I would be looking for a date coded 289 to match the car as close as possible, but definitely a 289.
 

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There was a Craigslist 289 for sale in Bay Area last month. I found some taillights down there before Thanksgiving. It was a trek but worth it.
 

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Honestly if you’re just looking for a fun car get a later 80s or 90s 302 from a junkyard. The upside side to a junkyard 302 is it will be built to run on modern gas, I believe they all should be roller blocks so you won’t have to run zinc in the oil, they’re cheap (at least here in Missouri), they have a serpentine belt (I’ve heard they are better than v belts), and you can easily add accessories when you want to like AC or power steering (just get a junkyard system plus the few parts that make it fit on your car). The downside is all the electrical stuff which can easily be changed out with a carbureted style intake, it won’t look original, it won’t be that fast, and it’s not going to be a fresh rebuild.
I haven’t done this but I helped my cousin do this in his Comet. We did put new rings, bearings, and gaskets on (so a light full rebuild) but the thing had compression in all cylinders and good oil so it would have run great pre rebuild.
 
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