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OK - I have headed down the Cougar path. Bought a 68 cougar, '85 302, 4BBL, 9 in rear and a new c4 transmission that the previous owner had problems with after he let it sit over the first winter of the tranny's installation.

Apparently water or coolant entered the transmission (my guess) and gunked things up. I am going to tow the car to my mechanic to have him diagnose the transmission problem and complete/adjust the linkage to the shifter as that was disconnected too.

Where would be the most likely place for the leakage and/or cause for the milky type stuff he found when trying to change the fluid and filter in the tranny? The previous owner stated he put in the correct fluids.

I'd appreciate any support as this Cougar is going to be restored a bit over the next 3 years until my son can drive.
 

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i dont think there's anywhere for water to get in except through the dipstick. there is a vent on top but i think that only relieves pressure (not real sure) and then there's the vacuum modulator, but if thats hooked up to the carb and the carb was buttoned up it shouldnt have water getting in there.

you said the C4 was brand new one year ago?
 

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The transmission is connected to a cooler that is built into the bottom of the radiator. If the cooler fails inside the radiator, then the coolant can enter the transmission. Disconnect the coolant lines at the transmission, and then put a piece of rubber hose between the two lines. (Be sure to move the threaded fittings back, put the hose directly ion the steel tubes, and use good clamps. A small amount of fluid will drain out of the radiator. Then start the car and bring it up to temperature. If you get coolant coming out of the radiator at the transmission cooler lines, you will have your answer. The pressure in the radiator, is higher than the pressure in the transmission cooling lines, so you might not get much transmission fluid in the coolant if what you have is just a small crack in the internal cooler.

That is why Cougarshaman suggested the radiator.
 

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The transmission is connected to a cooler that is built into the bottom of the radiator. If the cooler fails inside the radiator, then the coolant can enter the transmission. Disconnect the coolant lines at the transmission, and then put a piece of rubber hose between the two lines. (Be sure to move the threaded fittings back, put the hose directly ion the steel tubes, and use good clamps. A small amount of fluid will drain out of the radiator. Then start the car and bring it up to temperature. If you get coolant coming out of the radiator at the transmission cooler lines, you will have your answer. The pressure in the radiator, is higher than the pressure in the transmission cooling lines, so you might not get much transmission fluid in the coolant if what you have is just a small crack in the internal cooler.

That is why Cougarshaman suggested the radiator.
man i dont know how i forgot about that after running new lines for mine....sheesh
 

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I see a lot of 70 and older cars with external transimission radiators. Why is that? Is the internal radiator known to fail a lot, like in this case?
 

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I see a lot of 70 and older cars with external transimission radiators. Why is that? Is the internal radiator known to fail a lot, like in this case?
They are not necessarily known to fail. But I just like to have my radiator worry about cooling the motor and the external cooler handles the trans.
 

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also if you use the vehicle under heavy load conditions - like towing, you can benefit the trans greatly by adding and external cooler. Heat kills AT's - so the cooler the better.
 
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