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Discussion Starter #1
Is there a good one-stop supplier for suspension and brake upgrades for a '68 Cougar? It will be driven on the street, although if I could find a track every once in a while, I'd like to. The roads that I drive on range from interstate to highway to backroads where the surface will have bumps and uneven areas. I want the car to handle "spirited" driving, and the suspension not to get unsettled on the bumps, especially in turns. I also need it to stop in line with vehicles on the road today - when in the city or on the interstate, it's easy to get into tight confines, and I need to be able to stop quickly.

For the driving that I'll be doing, I'm thinking 560 lb front coil springs, ??? rear springs, good shocks, 1" front sway bar, ??? on rear sway bar (if at all), subframe connectors, shock tower brace, and in a perfect world - 4-wheel discs. I've done so much reading that I've confused myself, and this now seems to be a thrown together bunch of parts rather than a proven combination. I need a proven combination that works for my situation. Do you have any suggestions? Thank you.


 

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Your gonna get many ideas most likely. If your keeping the shock towers - be sure to check for cracks/weak spots first - they really should be beefed up for strength as it is a known weak point. Here are some brake parts/ideas/conversions: http://www.mustangsteve.com/granadadiscs.html subframe conn's are always a good idea, as well as monte carlo and export bracing.
 

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For spirited driving, look no further than stock Boss 302 stuff. It won't beat you up on the street and significantly improves the car over stock. Not terribly expensive to do, either.
 

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Well, IMHO...I love the Maier Racing stuff, very well built beefed up components, especially if you're keeping the shock towers. Shelby drop, some nice sport springs in the 560-620 rate, Sport valved Bilstien shocks, 1 inch front bar, lower eccentric lock out kit, but the kicker here is getting rear springs for our Cougars. I really don't know of anyone making a high performance rear spring. Sooo, you can have them made or get them Maier. They can get them in the correct rate for the Cougar from their supplier...pricey though. In the $350 to $400 range. I'd probably try for the #165 pounders for a spirited street car/occasional track toy. On the brakes, wow...there is like a million choices. Street or Track has good choices, Baer, The Brake Man, Wilwood, Cobra Automotive, CNC and Mustang Steve. I would stay away from the thinner Wilwoods (.810), they get chewed up on the street especially with power brakes. I put a Mustang Steve front kit on the wife's 66 Mustang. Pretty much have the whole kit on the car for about $600 bucks. 12.5 inch front rotors and calipers off a 2006 Mustang GT. Working great so far, off the shelf pads, and if they're good enough for an overweight 06, they'll be good on our lighter old cars. Hope this helps! Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The rear spring situation has me concerned. My stock ones sag, so I know that I need them. A friend of mine with a '67 Mustang convertible highly recommended Open Tracker. I hope to talk with them today. I'm also going to talk with Maier. I don't know anything about rear springs and rates. RoadRacer68, I'll do a little research on stock rear spring rates and keep the 165 lb rate in mind. I'll have a lot more questions for you all. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I got my rear leaf springs from Maier today. I hope to install them this weekend. I also got polyurethane bushings for the front eyes, and need to get the rubber ones out. What is the best way to get the new rubber bushings out and the new polyurethane bushings in? Also, I assume that the metal sleeve around the rubber bushings will need to stay for the polyurethane bushings - is this correct? Are the rubber bushings one piece or two piece. Thanks.
 

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Usually destroy the old bushings to get them out - I use as large a drill bit as will fit between the inner and outer sleeve and drill the rubber in a bunch of places around the perimeter, drive out the inner bushing and what's left of the rubber and then collapse the inner sleeve with a chisel.

I do not know for sure but and pretty sure any new bushing would not rely on having/using the outer sleeve from an old (or new) rubber bushing.

You could also have a machine shop press the bushings out but there is no way to get them out yourself except what I have described or burning the rubber out (which I would not recommend) and then doing what I described.

Regards,

Bob

Oh, and the bushings are one piece.
 

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Right-0- its a mutha to get them out. Also one thing to consider while your tearing into it is that the poly bushings are harder and sqeak quite loud - particularly when it's cold out. It's nice to drill/tap a grease zirk so you can keep those things quiet. Same hold true for your front suspension components if you get to it.....
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What would you do - run the new rubber bushings that are already in or get them out and install the polyurethane ones? Also, the polyurethane bushings don't need a sleeve? they install in the spring eye without a metal sleeve? Thanks.
 
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