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Discussion Starter #1
I want to replace the gear oil in my 68 without removing the carrier. Does anyone know if the studs that hold the carrier to the housing are screwed in or pressed in? If the studs are screwed in, I'm thinking that one of the bottom studs could be slotted and removed creating an instant drain plug. Am I right?
 

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I just changed out the 3rd member on my 8" - 1967. Studs are not threaded in housing. Might be a simple mod, but after finally getting mine to stop leaking, I ain't messing with it :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Rats. That's what I thought. I seem to recall them being actually more like bolts threaded in from the inside of the housing.

Ok, guys, what about plan B- go ahead and drill a hole in the bottom of the housing and tap it for a 3/8 or 1/2 inch pipe plug. Bad idea?
 

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Drill & tap sounds good to me, just keep the shavings out of the inside, and use a plug that has the square hole in it like the fill plug.
 

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Siphon the oil out through the filler hole with a clear plastic tube so you can monitor the progress. You can use gravity, compressed air assist or hand pump. In any case you won't have to worry about shavings because you won't be drilling and threading. Just make sure you get the siphon hose to the bottom of the casing. If you use gravity, let it drain overnight.
 

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Jody,

My $.02, there is not enough meat to properly form a thread in the housing, it is just too thin. The only well thought out option is welding in a bung (but understand why that may not be an option for you). The siphon through the fill sounds intriguing, but gear oil is pretty thick! As an innovator (and infamous cheapskate), I am sure you will come up with something, let us know what that ends up being!

Regards,

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just came in from the garage. Disaster. Covered in stinking 40 year old gear oil. Wife hates me now. Need shower.
 

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Just a little tip, throw away those clothes that you got gear oil on, or your wife will hate you for a long time, as you won´t be able to wash out the smell, and it may transfer over to other clothes washed along with them
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just a little tip, throw away those clothes that you got gear oil on, or your wife will hate you for a long time, as you won´t be able to wash out the smell, and it may transfer over to other clothes washed along with them
So... I should NOT have put them in the pile with the rest of the wash?..???
 

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nothing a clothesline, good wind,and a couple of years on there won't cure, eh?
 

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I'm thinking that smell is not just the 40 year old gear oil. If you have a traction-lock that smell is coming from the additive that Ford added to the gear oil. When you put in the new gear oil don't forget the additive! Shelby Parts and Restoration here in Green Bay usually has the stuff in stock.
 

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My bride has a particular dislike for the smell of differential lube. :uhoh: After installing my new trac loc carrier and carefully adding the Ford additive, I threw the empty bottle in the garage trash. The following AM Mama went out to her car & threw a hissy fit when she smelled the "Nasty oil". It seems the additive bottle tipped over & spilled the little bit left out into the trash. She swears she smelled it for days:evil:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Speaking of smells, last summer my wife came back from grocery shopping and handed me two bags along with instructions to "put these in the storage room and the freezer downstairs." One bag obviously contained various meats so that went into the freezer and the other with unknown contents went into the storage room. Weeks went by without incident until we began smelling something real nasty in the house. Convinced that something had crept in and died, we searched the house from top to bottom. It didn't take long to locate the source of the stench- the storage room and that seemingly innocuous second bag, which in fact, contained not only dry goods, but the smoldering remains of three family size packs of chicken legs and several packages of hot dogs. I darn near passed out carrying the stuff to the garbage bin in the garage. Garbage day was still a few days off so of course, that just stunk up the garage. I moved the bins outside. After noticing the neighbors pointing to our house with hands over their faces, I dragged the offensive bin to the back of the property and buried its contents in a shallow grave. The following morning the kids came running back into the house with watery eyes complaining of something at the back of the property. I went out there and discovered that in the night, some vile beast had dug up the grave and spread the still smoldering hot dogs and chicken around the yard. I dare not imagine what manner of creature would actually be attracted to that smell but whatever it was, even it feared to eat any of it. My wife came out and demanded I clean up the mess and dispose of it. "How?" I asked. We eventually determined to burn it in our fire pit. I got a healthy blaze going and bit by bit threw in the offensive material. At last (albeit reluctantly) the unholy stuff was consumed by the fire. The memory of that smell still haunts me to this day.
 

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I've found that a 1/8" NPT pipe plug (socket head) works very well in 8" and 9" housing.
 

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I've worked in abattoirs, and NOTHING like the smell of spoiled, really spoiled (like too long without freezing) chicken, came as close to making me sick.
 
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