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Discussion Starter #1
Help! I've been having a rough time with the cooling system on my cougar. the engine is a 351c 4v closed chamber. I have taken out the thermostat, had my radiator redone and installed an electric fan(16" dia.) on my car and backed the timing down to 6 deg BTDC and installed #78 jets in the primary metering block of my holley 750. any one experienced with cleveland motors or anyone with some advice please reply. thanks.
 

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Everything I've ever heard or seen with clevelands can be summed up with the following:

cleveland = crappy cooling

Something to do with the cooling passage design..

Anyway, I know that's not exactly much help... There are a number of cleveland owners on here that will pop up some actually useful information I'm sure... :D
 

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Hot Cleveland

Well, the first thing you have to do is to put the thermostat back in! The cooling system was designed to have that restriction. If the coolant is going through the radiator too fast it can't cool! A 180 degree stat should be just fine. A 160 degree stat will cause accelerated wear in the engine. That's why most engines after the early 70s came with 195s. The oiling is actually better and lessens the chance for sludge buildup.

Next, are you still running the stock fan? The stock fan and shroud should be plenty good. Wife's 70 Mustang is stock, but even with the high compression motor it has no trouble at all keeping cool. For my 73s, I have the stock flex fan with the thermostatic clutch. No problems at all keeping cool. The key is that you gotta have the shroud! If you live in a very hot region, an auxillary electric fan can be used. You should not use one as your only fan though!

The proper mix of anti-freeze is also necessary to get the proper ammount of heat transfer from the engine. Too much anti-freeze is actually bad! 50/50 is what is recommended by most manufacturers. The coolant also has other additives that are for water pump lube, anti-rust, etc.

How are you sacrificial anodes in your block? There are two zinc rods that are installed through the deck surface that go into the water jacket. When those get eaten away, you'll start geting a rust buildup. When that rust buildup gets thick in the block, your engine will run hot. Once that stuff gets in there it is really hard to get out. The best way is to remove all of the freeze plugs and flush the entire motor out. You can also try to flush it out the old fashioned way. You'd be amazed at how much junk will come out of there!
 

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Put back in the thermostat, It will not cool properly with out it. Have the heads been off latly? if so the head gaskets may have been put on wrong. Also was the block bored out more than .030? that may also be a cause. I recomend using a 3 or 4 core big block tipe os radator on the clevland. So when you put back in the t-stat look at the restrector ablut 1 inch below the t-stat in the block to make sure it is inplace and not roted awat. It should be brass as I remember . I had cooling problems with my clevland in the past and this is the info I used to fix the problem. Big radator, 180 t-stat and cleaned cooling system:angryfi:
Neal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks to all for your advice. i think the car sat for a long while and I haven't had it very long. there were some blue bead like things in the core of the rad before I had it redone. maybe some stop leak or something. since i posted last there seems to be some new valvetrain noise. and now oil pressure is all over the place. on a turn the o/p drops to about 15psi. only in the turns though. i think i got the shaft. i think i'll start on a new motor. maybe a stroked windsor. and thanks again for the replies.
 
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