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Discussion Starter #1
I just pulled the valve cover of my right cylinder head to see if I can find out what heads are on. Underneath I found the following numbers which don't help me (novice as I am) much:

Between cylinder 2 and 3 there's a big 0 (zero) and between cylinder 3 and 4 it says 4D28.

Anyone here knows what that means?
Btw, the engine probably is a 289 (casting number of intake C6, autolite 2100 carb, casting # of the block probably C6 (could be C8)).

Thanks,
Matthijs
 

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Could be a couple things

The 4D28 is a date code that probably means:
4= 1964 or 1974 or 1984
D=April
28=Day of month

The way to tell the difference is by other factors. A 1964 289 head has a slot where the pushrod passes through the head casting. The early head also has adjustable rockers with the rocker stud shank being straight , that is to say the same diameter from top to bottom.

A 1974 302 head would have a round hole where the pushrod comes through the head. The rocker stud on a 1974 head would have a shoulder, that is to say the stud is reduced size at the top so the nut bottoms out on the stud and the valves are not adjustable.

A 1984 head has a rocker retained by a bolt instead of a stud. It uses what is known as a sled fulcrum rocker which is also non adjustable.

Royce Peterson
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Royce,

I've determined the heads to be 1964 289 heads.
There's another thing cated onto them, between the rockerstuds of cylinders 4 and 5:

L5319 (or 53197, probably the first).

Anyone knows what this is?

Then another question, if it turns out to be a 289, is it worth keeping the heads for use on the 302 I'll be swapping the block for? I mean in terms of performance combined with other cam and intake & carb (aiming for a street/strip machine, lots of torque at low rpms).

Thanks,
Matthijs
 

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Head Performance

The 1964 head is as good as any other 289 - 302 head from 1963 to 1967. Starting in 1968 a lump appears in the exhaust port for smog air injection. So I would keep them. If you need to do any work a good thing is to install 1.94 intake valves and 1.60 exhaust valves. Porting on the exhaust port is a good thing to do also. The 1964 head has a small combustion chamber which is considered a good thing too.

Royce Peterson
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I finally made up my mind and decided to swap the short block for a 302 and bolt on the 289 heads.
Now I've got some other questions about it.
- If I use 289 heads and put in a cam with 0.500 lift and some decent duration, is there any danger with regards to the valve clearance? I sure wouldn't like the valves to bump into the pistons at any time.
- Is there a way to make 289 2v heads work together with a 4v carb? Is there intakes for that purpose or should I get the heads machined?
- What exactly is porting? I figure it is somthing I cannot do myself for the term gives me visions of changing the inner shape of the intake/exhaust ports in the heads.
- Is theere any machining to do to fit different size valves in the heads? I sure like to know these things upfront so I can have them all done when I get the heads reconditioned.

Thanks in advance.

Cheers,
Matthijs
 

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Sounds like a good plan

Matthijs,

Sounds like a good plan. Porting is best left to experienced hands, it means opening the passage to a new larger shape. I bet there are people in your area who can do this.

Any machine shop can handle the installation of the larger valves, it's not a big change and it involves simply cutting a new valve seat, then removing any excess seat below the valve and blending that area with the port.

A cam under .500" lift should work fine but it should be checked anyway just in case. This will be easy to do while the engine is apart for rebuilding.

You should consider roller fulcrum rockers and a good quality roller timing chain. These parts add reliability and decrease internal friction. That means less heat so a little more power for spinning the rear tires!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the info Royce!

So if I understand it right it would be possible to adapt the intake ports to another type (4v) manifold, right?
Now what are these things called roller rockers? I've been told thay are great, but have no idea what they are compared to normal rockers.
I'm thinking of throwing them in at the same time, since the short block comes without pushrods and all and I'm saving a lot of euro's doing it this way instead of swapping for a 302 4v long block.
Another thing, I can specify the cam I want and have it put in with the block, so I was wondering what the meanest is I should consider.
I've read in other threads that a [email protected] is about as far as you can go for a streetable car, does that count for a 302 as well? I'm not gonna consider things like mpg's (lpkm's), I just want the meanest (streetable) cat I can make with my budget.

About the machining I think I'm kind of lucky in the region, since there's a shop specializing in drag racing bow-ties (I know, I know, but it's not a big issue over here) which I recon can help me out with porting and some advise on blueprinting as well.

Thanks again!

Cheers,
Matthijs.
 

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Cams

Matthijs.

I think a cam with .230 duration at .050" would be good for a manual transmission car. If using a cam like that in an automatic you need a different torque converter for the transmission, commonly called high - stall. This is because a cam with specs like that causes the engine to lose idle quality. The engine would sputter and stall a lot if you install a cam like that without changing torque converters.

Roller rocker arms have bearings at the tip and at the fulcrum.

The ports on 2V and 4V 289 heads are the same so there is no problem there.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Short Block

One more question on the block swap:

Are there any differences in the 68 302 and any other year 302 short block? I'm kind of keen to know what catches there are in swapping engines, so I know what to be weary of.

Thanks,
Matthijs
 

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Small block differences

Matthijs,

The later small blocks, those made after 1978 have two differences that might be important. The first is that the late blocks have an extra mounting boss at the passenger front side for attachment of a smog pump bracket. The other difference is that they did not include the boss for early style clutch pivot ball mounting at the rear driver side. Otherwise there are no important differences. There are no blocks of the common variety that are better or worse than any other for use as a 302. Ford Racing Performance Parts has offered a heavy duty block but most people are just fine with the ordinary ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Great thanks!!
I must say I get the feeling there's a walking & talking encyclopedia around here ;)

Cheers!
Matthijs
 

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There is one other thing to remember about the 302's regarding years. In 1980?? or was it 82 Ford went with a 50 oz flywheel and balancer weight instead of the former 28 oz. So that could be and issue.

I would reccomend you stay with a 79 or older short block with the 28 oz balance weights so you can reuse your present flywheel and harmonic balancer.mm
 
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