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Discussion Starter #1
This is a little opinion poll I thought I would shoot out to everyone.

I came across a posting for a 1970 Eliminator which apparently is VIN #50001 or the first off the line for 1970. Now I understand why the first car off the line for a new introduction model will demand a greater price. In this case I would suggest that the first ever production Eliminator in 1969 should command a better price than the first off the line for the 1970 model year.

But, here is the real question....shouldn't the very last recorded Eliminator ever produced (1970) be worth the most? :confused: Does anyone know whether the very last one produced is still alive and if so....what the VIN# for it might be? :rolleyes:

Just had me thinking a little.....what's your thoughts everyone? :1poke:

Dale
 

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I always thought that the first ones of any production year would be the most valuable. Of course I would take any eliminator.

Look at most of the limited production late model cars. The Mfg. usually keeps production #1-3 or so.
Like the 93/95/00 Cobra R. I have read that Ford has #1 of each of them for show.
 

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I think I tend to agree with dalerivers. The last production one should command just as much as the first one, conditions being the same. Just an opinion.
 

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I also agree with Dale, but then I like his name, lol:D
Dayle
 

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FIRST AND LAST

I don't know about first and last being more valuable. I think the overall condition and workmanship as well as complete originality are the most important things to consider when determining value. I have sold several ELIMINATORS and the 69 Hurst rental Eliminator with the sunroof while a very early production and one of a handful so optioned, is more valuable than the 69 428CJ Eliminator I had. Yet all in all, My low milaeage 69 convertible that is all original down to the orange FA-50 Autolite air filter should command an equal value due to the rarity of a one of five original convertibles. Value and beauty is all in the eye of the beholder. We all love our "cats".
"2005 COUGAR CRUISE ACROSS AMERICA
 

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I totally agree. Being the first VIN number is not that important compared to the attributes of the car itself. If the first 1970 Cougar was a standard coupe with Lime Frost Metallic paint and Dark Green bench seat interior with a 351W and 3 speed it would just be another car I would have no interest in owning.

But being a Boss 302 Eliminator, it has value of its own merit. It is now more interesting than another identical Boss 302 Eliminator, not necessarily more valuable.

Royce Peterson:1poke:
 

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YES- INTERESTING IS KEY

Yes, I agree. With one exception on the color. I think that as many Cougar, Mustang, Shelby and more collectors shun the lime frost paint the more collectible it is. Not as many around as one might think and I really like the color.
True, lime frost with a dark green bench is not really the best combo. Although the 3-speed tranny is harder to find as these cars were parted and shuned as well in favor of a 4-speed or automatic. It may well turn out that in years to come the simplest "plain Jane" Cougar will be the most unusual as the "collectors" strive to find and restore the big blocks,
eliminators, GT-E's, and convertibles. The very car you described might well be a rare and collectible oddity. A thought to consider as I have. :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all your input folks....some interesting points brought up that I never even thought of. Glad I started this little poll.

Thanks again

Dale
 
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