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I have a lead on a 1967 Cougar (GT) with a 390 V8 automatic. The car has the C-6 tranny and 9-inch rear end. The body is solid with some very minor rust around the rockers and trunk. The interior is in good shape with some minor wear and some replaced interior pieces (carpet and headliner). The front end has been rebuilt and the car has all new springs. It has a new dual exhaust and rebuilt disc brakes. The car was in a left-side wreck but has been repaired. Unfortunately, the door was replaced and the data plate is missing but the original VIN is still present on the fenders so I'm fairly confident it's an authentic GT. The engine is out of a 68 cougar and was rebuilt but has a few aftermarket pieces (Eldebrock manifold). The car runs strong but the paint is faded and needs to be buffed out and/or repainted. The owner won't part with it for less than $7,500. Is this a fair price?:confused:
 

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I paid 6,000 for mine about a year ago ...but it had been gone through a few years before.. everything is original except for the Radio. I had to have the paint color sanded last month and now it's looking pretty good. I still need some minor work here and there. anyway It might be a fair price... find out where it built and if possible & where it's been. Mine was built in San Jose and first sold in Bakersfield, CA. So it has always been a California Car which = NO rust..... My Two Cents

Don
 

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hmmmmmm

Thats a tough one. I paid $7,500 for my 68 XR7-G. (see photo section) It is all original (except mirror and exhaust tips) 302, leather, a/c, pwr steering - brakes - sunroof, fog lights etc. and it too was a Southern Cal car. I thought I got a great deal myself. But this is a tough call...But if you REALLY want it - get it, because we all know you will be kicking yourself when you see another one and you missed out on this one.
 

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Nada can tell you how much the car is worth( low, high, and meduim retail). You need to enter yor cars extra features to get it's worth. :D hope this helps:D
 

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There's a 67 390 4 speed GT for sale here in San Diego. I haven't seen it, but I've been told by another Cougar fan that it's pretty nice. New front end, exhaust system. Rebuilt at some point. Very nice body and interior. Older paint. $7500?

I'll see if I can get better info this weekend.

Tim B
 

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For a non- numbers matching car deduct at least 50% of the 'premium value' of the car. That means that if it is an original big block car gets a $1200 premium over a small block, give it a $600 bump. If the GT package is another $1000 premium over a standard car, that means $500.

Of course, you'd have to determine if this car was really indeed a GT to begin with. If it isn't an authentic GT, it is really only worth standard.

For being hit hard and repaired, deduct another 15%.

For the condition being less than desireable, deduct another 15%.

Ya gotta ask yourself one question. What is this car worth to you! What are you willing to invest in this car to make it as right as it can be. Is it worth trying to track down those annoying little pieces that it would take to make it cherry.

If it was me, I'd pass on this one.
 

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I would probably pass too...The funny thing about buying classic cars is that it's a lot easier to buy the car for $3000, and fix it up for antoher $10,000 - than to buy the car for $10,000 and fix it up for another $3000. It's hard, mentally, to drop all that money and know that it still needs work. On the other hand buying a car cheap and fixing it up slowly is a little easier to overcome, especially if you can picture the final product in your head...

My current 68 XR-7 cost $3000 [pictures coming real soon, sorry for the delay] and as you can guess, it needed work. When I got it it had a nice body, no damage other then a few little dings, and it wasn't salvaged [don't buy a salvaged car] but... it needed paint. The seats and carpet needed some treatment. The engine ran nicely, and was the original block, but it was just a 302. Further more the sequincials and headlight doors, and speedo and all that stuff. I think I got a fair deal for this car. Not a good or bad deal, just fair.

I bought my 70 cougar for $7500. It was pretty much a show car... It had a brand new 351W and a freshly rebuilt FMX transmission. I liked it a lot. Had perfect interior and everything. Great paint and a perfect body. The car needed no work. I also think this was a fair deal.

Of course neither of these were as glamorous as a gt / big block cars, but it gives you an idea of what I think a fair price is. If you're going to put 20,000 dollars into it [which isn't really that hard] then the price you paid for it doesn't even really matter as long you paid less then 10 grand for it... which you aren't. It's all relative. Perhaps what you should ask yourself is, is the car worth how much you're willing to put into it. If you can get everything nice and looking good, and people will break their necks spinning around to get a look as you fly by, for 10,000 dollars... and it's really a GT - then I call that a deal. - Chad
 

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I'll have to agree with Chad

It's definitely all about what it's worth to you and only you.

When I got my first cat I'd been unemployed due to a back injury for near seven months. To make matters worse, my RX7 (not XR7) died shortly after the injury so getting around was near impossible. I needed wheels, and a good friend of mine was willing to lend about $2k to help me get a running car. So what do I do? Found this ad in the paper for a 67 standard. Hadn't been driven in 12 years or more, looked like hell.. so I got that.
$1050 for the car, $900 shop bill to make it move under it's own power (albeit blowing smoke and generally not liking to stop under any circumstances). Didn't matter that it was the most common type of Cougar, didn't matter that I hadn't money for food, rent or anemnities - to have a Cougar of any variety was the holy grail to me since I was little.

Heh.. so what's the moral of the story? If you see a car that makes your heart skip a beat and makes your imagination go wild then price really isn't the issue. Doesn't even matter if it's a friggin' VW Beetle - if something tells you that car is your (vehicular) soul-mate then you owe it to yourself get it by any means.

On the other hand, if the car in question here doesn't have much effect on you then $7500 is probably too much regardless of how much money you have.
 

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One more cent....
If you can't get your mind off of it.... If you drive by it more than three times a week... If you (once you buy it) get called in at 11:00 at night by the 'ole lady because "your always looking/working on that cat!!!!... come to bed!!!!"
Then you have your labor of love and you cannot put a price on it. I was recently asked if may car was for sale.... I just grinned and said "NO"

Don
 

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I think you have pretty much recieved enough opinions to more than help out with your question and it really comes down to how much do you want to spend and if the car seems worth it to you. I piad $3,000 for my car two years ago, it was pretty much worth that amount, not much more. I had an idea in my head of what I wanted my car to look and run like when I complete the project. To me $3,000 was a good price and I didn't even negotiate it. It had everything I was looking for and the car was complete and all there, granted most of it needed help. It barely ran, mostly because of carb problems and most of the electrical didn't even function, so basically the car wasn't even DOT legal yet. I first took it to a guy who works and restores older mustangs and Fords and spent about $450 to get it ready to drive. I then started feeling like I was making emiediate progress, though there was a lot more to do. Some people say your more ahead of the game to buy a completely restored car for $10-15,000, some wrather buy a car for $700 in ten different boxes and build it from ground up. I on the other hand was in the middle, couldn't afford a complete restored car, but also couldn't afford to buy some thing that was going to have to be completely redone from bumber to bumber. So I was looking for a Mercury Cougar or Comet from 1967 and set a price of $3,000 as my budget for getting the project car. From what I researched and shopped around I could get a fairly good and solid car for that amount. Since then I have put about $4,000 into it and haven't really touched the engine much and still needs the body work done. I wouldn't have it any other way. I just take my time as money comes along and plan three to six months in advance as to what the next big project on the car will be and budget for that. It's a process and it takes time, but I would wrather work and progress as I am than to buy some trailor queen car and is complely done and know nothing about it other than how to drive the thing off a trailor at a car show and how my attorney come-over hair due looks. So if a car that is 80-100% done then there isn't a whole lot of research and reading you will have to do or a whole lot of renching involved to cruise around and be happy in your ride. If you get into something that is about 30-50% restored or to the point of what your final vision is, then be prepared for the pocket book, garage space, book of swear words, Craftsman's membership card at Sears, researching on the web and books, going to swap meets, and weekends under the car. It's a great hobby and can get pricey at times, but if you do things right and think about the way you want your car to be a look, then the personel price of satifaction and pride you will get out of the car way surpases whatever you initially pay for it. It all comes down to what you can afford and what you want, if $7500 sounds reasonable or it's not that hard to come by for you, then I think you know the answer. Enjoy your Cougar and I would like to see your pictures.
 

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"..attorney come over hair due...?

Due ewe have sum sort ov voice tiping softwere? ;) I think you meant 'attorney comb-over hairdo'!

Sorry, a few Warsteiners and I get silly... :p

Edited cuz I can't spell either after a few Warsteiners....
 
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