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I read in our local newspaper that the ethanol blended gasoline currently being sold is probably going to be increased to E-15. I know of only one gas station in my local area that sells pure gasoline. Is anyone on this site versed on the real facts associated with the use of E-10 AND E-15 ethanol blended gasoline. It looks like its going to be very difficult to find pure gasoline in the future. What are the real pro and con uses of the blend?
 

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There are no reals pros, maybe a small amount of cleaner emissions, but nothing other than that. The only reaon it is going in is because the oil companies can get it cheaper, because of the government substities. It actually costs more to make than gas, but because the government wants a renewable resource (though there is no way demand for it could be met if for some reason we ran out of oil) and is paying most of the costs of it, it is cheaper.

It is nasty stuff. The ethanol absorbs water and will get in a carb or injector and destroy it. It also needs a higher air fuel ratio to burn properly. In a carb application you may not notice a difference in fuel milage (unless you change jets accordingly), but it will run leaner. In fuel injected car, the fuel milage drops a little.
 

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I find the mileage to drop a lot. From around 32 in the summer to around 27 in the winter in my 1.5L Scion xA.
 

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You'll also notice a increase in vapor lock problems with the blends. It will also eat up fuel pump diphrams.
 

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We have had ethanol in our fuel for years now and, like the change to unleaded, there are lots of old wives tales about how it eats up fuels systems, attracts moisture, causes infertility, etc.. Very little hard evidence of any of that with 10% blends.

The only thing I have noticed is a reduction in mileage by about 10 - 15%. The cars tend to run a bit better on our ethanol blends because they are a higher octane than straight unleaded
 

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there are lots of old wives tales about how it causes infertility
That's actually true, if you drink it. Very much like the homemade beer my neighbor makes (and shares) - it can also make you go blind. Fortunately it is only temporary, so far anyway.
 

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...The only thing I have noticed is a reduction in mileage by about 10 - 15%...
Yep, exactly my experience: 32 * .85 = 27.2 so 15% is right on the money, at least for me. One more reason I don't like it. It's effectively reducing the mileage by more than the amount of the ethanol added.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the feedback about the use of ethanol. I guess the best bet is to use the pure gasoline in my cougar. Its not driven on a regular basis, especially in these winter months. I may try seeing if I can notice the difference in gas mileage on my 2010 Focus 2dr coupe with a 5 speed. The 10/15% drop with the use of the ethanol blended vs the pure gasoline may be worth investigating. Don the site you refrenced is exactly the site I used to find a station that was selling pure gasoline. THANKS
 

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We use to have a place called the "Pop Shop" that sold aviation fuel, you could only put it in an "approved" container, then go around the block and dump it in your car....130 octane! They didn't allow you to fuel up at the pump with it. You could always tell on friday night while crusing, that they guy next to you was burning it.
 

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Ethanol (e-10) has been in most of the regular unleaded in New England for years. My 2001 Ford Focus 5 speed pre ethanol consistently got 33 mpg's, now I am lucky if I get 30, and have seen as low as 28.
 

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Gasohol, or E10 as it is being called nowadays, has just been introduced in Germany, where governmental statutory provisions also demand minimum revenue concerning E10. This fuel blend has stirred quite some worries among motorists ever since it has been announced. The fuel system in my 2006 Ford holds up well, but classic cars are generally deemed unfit.

ethanol surely has an corrosive effect on aluminum carbs. I had bought some used Carter BBDs in a garage sale that had been sitting on the shelf for over 25 years, when gas contained far less alcohol and was formulated differently. Internal corrosion of the fuel bowls, brass floats and brass bleeds, needles and jets was FAR LESS on those compared to the used Carter Competition I got last year. That Carter Comp. on the other hand had been run on modern ethanol-blended gasoline before it had been taken off the engine and sat for about half a year before I got my hands on it. Had to scrub the bowls real good with steel wool and diluted formic acid to get rid of the oxydation products. The surfaces of the bowls had become quite pitted.

So far, I believe the corrosion effects getting worse the longer the fuel is allowed to sit and break down over time, like during winter storage or such. Filling up on ethanol-blended fuel and going through that tank within a couple of days would probably not show immediate effects on the metals used in our fuel systems.

Also, there's always some kind of fuel treatment to enhance protective properties, like fuel sta-bil or restomotives fuel preservator. Even a rather homeopathic dose of two-stroke oil has gained quite a reputation of protecting fuel systems from the ill effects of gasohol blends.
 

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Ethy bites for mileage without a doubt. It's .10 cheaper here (farm subsidy) and I still don't buy it since the offset for mileage doesn't pay. From the pure-gas site it looks like 94 octane is the winner nowadays huh? Phillips 66 if you have any around. Remember when that was the cheap stuff! Those were the days <sigh>. I don't see the place in Illinois that used to sell blue-pump fuel on the list anymore? It was there about 3 years ago - Like Jay says, you had to pump it into a container not a car. (It's about 1/2 mile from the dragstrip) Man I love the smell of high octane in the morning! ;>)
 

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There was a local news report recently here where mechanics were saying that a lot of the engine problems that they are getting are the result of E10. They were talking about newer model cars and others. So far my engine seems fine.
 
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