Mercury Cougar Owners banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All
I have read over a number of old posts about the differences between elec and mechanical fans and have come across a term that I am having a little trouble finding. "Spal pwm or computer"? I need to upgrade from my 20" to a 24" due to overheating issues while sitting at lights with A.C. on. Car has run a little warmer since the install of the condensor in front of radiator but really doesn"t like it when at a stop. Current radiator is a 20" 2 row with a FlexFan and shroud to fit fan.
I am thinking of going with a 3 row 24" aluminum radiator with dual 12" fans. Have found a number of different kits to hook up fan but all have a "probe" that I don"t know where it would go. The other option I am unsure about is whether to go with just the radiator and 2 12" fans or if I should go with the one that also has a shroud for the dual fans. The radiators I have been looking at are the Champions, decent deals on eBay.
Any suggestions or clarification is much appreciated!! For now I just shut off A.C. when at a stop, getting old... and warm, this way.
Charlie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Isn't anyone running electric fans? Hoping to find how temp sensor for fans is set up/placed, installed.
Thanks
Charlie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
spal pulse width modulated( pwm) is a computer controller for electric fan(s)---gets a signal off of your temp sender or a second sender--i used a second sender in the thermostat elbow( Napa )---the spal sender did not work well and their tech guys said they tried to copy a chrysler sender---i bought a factory chrysler sender and the unit works wonderful---thermostat temp @ idle withe the a/c on @ 95 deg outside--it requires a 140 amp alernator and some skill to hook up
doctordesoto
 

·
Contributing Member
Joined
·
5,865 Posts
Isn't anyone running electric fans? Hoping to find how temp sensor for fans is set up/placed, installed.
Thanks
Charlie

yes - I'm running twin 12" fans on the 68. I used a windsor temp sender from an local Falcon but any in-block fan switch sender will do. You need to run 2 x relays, one for each fan, and a third relay if you want to trigger one fan when the a/c cuts in. I am running a 100amp alternator and it works fine, although the a/c isn't hooked up at the moment as I'm getting the pipes run under the fender
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Don't mean to come across like I need to have my hand held on this but am really not too far from there... I wonder if anyone might have photos of where the heat sensor would hook up? I have one currently that runs the temp gauge and have another just like it(in a box) that maybe could be used to work as a sensor for the fans? I'm not sure where peple are putting these things, some kits I have seen online have "push-in" sensors listed for 1968 cars. Can't see how that thing is not going to shoot out of the car like a bullet once it is up to pressure... I have A.C. and it would be great to have at least one fan kick on when the A.C. is on and both at red lights. Seem some with a manual over-ride switch, which I think is an on/off switch for the fans.
Any help with placement of sensor and if other parts are needed is really appreciated!! Pictures are always helpfull. I have the stock alternator, assuming that it will not cut it with the electric fans? If anyone has links to parts needed or links with walkthroughs for install would really help!
Thanks
Charlie
 

·
Contributing Member
Joined
·
5,865 Posts
You need to use a temperature switch in the inlet manifold (it is better in a bung in the lower radiator tank). The switch is like a gauge sensor but will provide a ground at a defined temperature like 190F and cut off at 180F. Your local parts place should have them

Here is a diagram of the relay set up required for two fans with a/c. (Ignore the washer and horn relays). The little doo-hickey with the circle with an X in it is the indicator light powered off the ignition circuit

68 Relay Diagram.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Most of the radiators that I have looked at don't seem to have the option of adding an additional hole/bung for the sensor. Since it is in the tank portion of the radiator that you suggest as the best option, do you think it is something that I could drill and tap into the tank? I have an Edlebrock 289/z89 performer intake, there are a number of ports that are blocked with removable plugs. I'm sure at least one of them must be in the water jacket portion of the intake. I guess that would work if modifying the radiator is a bad idea.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
One other thought... Is it possible to tap onto the existing sensor for the temp gauge and use it at the sensor for the fans as well as the temp gauge? Probably not but would be the simplest solution to the problem : )<o:p></o:p>
Charlie<o:p></o:p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
A local radiator shop could add you a bung hole in your tank for a modest price. If you can locate the proper flange, possibly at a plumbing supply house - copper, and fell confident in your soldiering ability you could give it a try. ANY unused hole into the water jacket will work but the bottom tank gives the best reading. I am not sure if you could use one sensor for both, the fans might pull enough current off to give a bad reading at the gauge.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Is this car you daily driver or just a summer/cruise car?

Reason I ask is there are some very effective additives that you can use and not expensive that will signifigantly drop your engine temps, therefore reducing or iliminating the need for you to turning the A/C off ect.
However, if you need heat for the winter,(gets a tad cold in NE, no?), then it may be slightly counterproductive where it lowers your temps too much to make the heat real hot.

They are oil and coolant additives that work great, I use to be a dealer for them and highly recommend you check them out, although they do not list daily automotive applications, they do have race teams use their products religiously and I can attest they do work and the priciple is the same.

In one instance, we dropped our engine temps by 30 deg.

http://www.two2cool.com/

They also make coolant that lowers temps and when used in conjunction with each other can lower temps by 50 deg or better, some have gotten up to 70 deg cooler.

I did 6 test runs on a motorcycle with 1/2 hour ice cold cool down periods in between tests and the first three runs were without the oil additive and the last three runs were with the additive and the temp drop was an avg of 30 deg reduction.

I know this is a different approach to your situation, however, the principle is the same, if your engine temp is getting hotter and your coolant is as well, you are also loosing power.

You can also swap out your thermostat to a lower open degree so your coolant flows sooner through the thermo.

J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Hi All
I have read over a number of old posts about the differences between elec and mechanical fans and have come across a term that I am having a little trouble finding. "Spal pwm or computer"? I need to upgrade from my 20" to a 24" due to overheating issues while sitting at lights with A.C. on. Car has run a little warmer since the install of the condensor in front of radiator but really doesn"t like it when at a stop. Current radiator is a 20" 2 row with a FlexFan and shroud to fit fan.
I am thinking of going with a 3 row 24" aluminum radiator with dual 12" fans. Have found a number of different kits to hook up fan but all have a "probe" that I don"t know where it would go. The other option I am unsure about is whether to go with just the radiator and 2 12" fans or if I should go with the one that also has a shroud for the dual fans. The radiators I have been looking at are the Champions, decent deals on eBay.
Any suggestions or clarification is much appreciated!! For now I just shut off A.C. when at a stop, getting old... and warm, this way.
Charlie
I had 2 row radiator on my '87 Cutlass, but it started to leak, so I put in a 1 row aluminum one. I thought for sure that it would overheat, but the aluminum one does a much better job than the copper.

I haven't done anything like this with my Cougar, but with my Cutlass, I put on 2 electric fans. I believe the 'probe' you are talking about, is what I got with my thermostatic temperature kit. It consists of a relay, and a probe, that actually mounts THROUGH the radiator, in the fins. When I put in the aluminum one, the probe actually sticks out of the radiator, due to it being so thin! But, it still works good, and I really didn't mess with the thermostatic setting much. But, how it works, is when the probe senses the correct temperature, it trips the relay, and turns on the fan. When I put the second fan in, I wired that up to another relay, and also wired it to the 'hot' wire going to the A/C compressor. So, when the A/C is on, that fan is constantly on. The other fan still kicks on when the temp of the radiator reaches a certain temp, but it has to be really hot out for that to happen.

So, with the aluminum radiator working so well in my '87 Cutlass, I'm thinking of putting one in my Cougar, as that one is starting to leak as well. I'm also thinking of putting an electric fan on, as the car rarely seems to get hot! Of course, my A/C isn't even on the car, but when it is, then I'll just hook up another fan, to the hot wire, like my Cutlass. That set up seems to work the best!

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Very encouraging words!! Maybe it is not the nightmare I imagined. Putting the probe into the fins is simple enough and sounds like it is effective for you. Also I read information suggested via web link and they do a great job of describing the process. They use a totally different car but the info pertinent to the Cougar or other cars is easily adaptable to my needs and I'm sure helpful to others contemplating this road.
Charlie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I would like to hear more about additives mentioned by another member. Sounds like something worth a look if it can drop temps as much as the examples. My Cougar does not do really any winter driving, heat is used for fall rides and the occational dry road nice days in winter. Winter is usually not an option because it means removing covers and taking it off wheel dollies but sometimes I just need a ride...
Charlie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
I will try to find some more examples of additives that will reduce engine temps, but it is one of those things that may spark the controversy of debate.

Some guys swear by them, some guys say it made no differance, etc. You have to try for your self.

Simple things like a gylcol based anti-freeze with 50/50 mix of distilled water, redline water wetter, great airflow threw rads with no obstructions, higher octane gas, ignition timing, etc make absolutely knock your engine temps dow by a few degrees. Remember, the differance between boiling and not boiling is 1 degree when it comes down to it....
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top