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Discussion Starter #1
I am having some problems with the window opening/closing mechanisms in the doors of my 69 Cougar.

At some point in the cars history, the window glass has come out of the cast alloy runners that move the windows up & down when the handle is turned. A previous owner has tried to fix this by wedging strips of toothed rubber cam belt next to the glass when putting it back into the runners.

The problem is that if the windows are opened or closed with anything other than extreme caution, the runners pivot on the winding mechanism, the windows spring out and drop down inside the doors.

I had considered bonding the windows into the runners using a strong panel adhesive (we have a product over here (England)called "No More Nails" an extra strong glue that will stick just about anything together) but I didn't know whether or not some movement of the glass was required to allow the windows to slide into place.

Can anyone offer any ideas for a more permanent fix or had this problem and solved it?

Thanks in advance

Chris
 

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Chris,

Your problem is, sadly, a common one among 69 owners. It is not however fatal. The Classic Cougar Network has a great tech article that tells how to reglue your windows the right way. (http://www.theclassiccougarnetwork.com/tccn/frame.html)
If you are not already a member I strongly urge you to join. It's only $12 US a year and the wealth of info on the site is invaluble!
Their URL is http://www.theclassiccougarnetwork.com

Good luck and Happy Cattin'!

:)
 

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Window Glue

This is a repost of my response to this problem from another thread. Search through the topics here and you'll see several threads on window glues....

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Channel Bonding Adhesive

FYI, 3-M Channel Boding Adhesive works just fine. Once I've used this stuff, I have never had to re-glue a window yet.

My wife's old 77 Marquis had those slide-down vent windows. They had to be glued in place. I first tried some other kind of window adhesive and it didn't last for squat. After using the 3-M stuff, I never had another problem with them. Seven years and no problems. The driver's side front window had to be opened every day since the wife had to use a key-card to gain entrance to her workplace parking lot. If you have seen the sequence of the window operation, first the vent window goes down, then the main window goes. That's a lot of window use, in all sorts of weather. No problems with the window once I set them with the Channel Bonding Adhesive.

If you follow the directions correctly, making certain that the glass is clean, with absolutely no residue on it, it works fine. Lacquer thinner is best to use here. I went the extra step and sanded the window surface a bit where the glue was going to be to give it some extra 'bite' surface.

What I'm trying to say is don't be afraid to try regluing your glass. What do you have to lose? Just make sure you use the right stuff!

The 3-M stuff is available at most parts stores that cater to the professionals. Forget Pep Boys, and Auto Zone here. They'll look at you funny then try to sell you normal runny-assed epoxy. The 3-M stuff ain't cheap either. about $12 for the twin tube applicator. You don't need the mixing gun. just squirt out equal parts (use a stick or socket extension that you have marked for a certain depth), mix, and apply. You have about five minutes working time at normal room temperature. Next leave it alone for a couple of hours before attempting to move the window or clean up the excess. Use a razor blade to scrape up the excess.

Mark the location of the channel on the glass with a permanent marker. I normally clean up the channel off the car to remove old stuff from the channel to make room for the new glue. then reinstall the channel. Mix the glue, then fill channel. install glass. Yes, I'm installing the glass when with the regulator and channel in the door. It works best making sure you get the angle right. Hey, you have the door panels off anyway, so it really is easy.

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Chris,

Whatever you do, don't use the liquid nails adhesive! Check around the auto glass repair shops there in the UK to see what they use... If they are unwilling to help you, try checking a good auto parts store. If still no luck, drop us a line and maybe we can ship you some of the good stuff....

Cougrrcj
 

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A Slight Disagreement

I'm afraid I have to disagree with Cougrrjc on this one. After regluing windows in several '69s, I've come to the conclusion that you're better off to remove the channel from the door and do your glue job on a flat surface where you can shim the window in the channel properly and let the adhesive set up correctly.

There are adjustments for lining up the window/channel in all three planes when they are reinstalled, so I've found it's best to start the alignment process from scratch, with the window glued squarely into the channel. It takes a little more time, but aligning the window correctly with the weatherstripping to keep wind and rain out is worth the effort. You also end up with a window that stops at the correct points when rolled up or down.

I also firmly believe in removing all the old glue from the channel before regluing. One reason products like 3M Channel Bond work well for this application is that they remain flexible enough when set to absorb the different rates of temperature expansion and contraction found in the glass and channel. This difference in expansion is the reason most adhesives fail, including the stuff Ford used in the first place. If you don't remove the old glue, you're hindering the new adhesive's ability to flex with temperature changes. Removing all the old glue means you'll need more new adhesive to fill the channel, but again, it's worth it.

Keep on Cattin'!

Steve
 

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Steve,

You say toe-may-toe, I say toe-mah-toe...

When I glue the window, I want the channel with the open end up so the glue stays in place. I also want to make sure the window stays centered in the channel widthwise. From my own experience I have found that it is easier to do in the car since the window is held straight in the opening, and the channel is held straight by the regulator. The window needs a certain ammount of inward lean at the top so it contacts the weatherstrip with the correct pressure.

When gluing, I have removed most of the old glue from the channel. I remove it all on the sides of the channel, but I carve a 'V' into the old glue on the bottom This V notch helps hold the window straight in relation to the channel -- sort of self centering, if you know what I mean. This way I don't have to worry about how deep the window goes into the channel, or making sure it is even in depth the length of the channel.

I'm sure each of us have glued enough windows that we have formulated our own techniques. You do it your way and I do it mine. You have to do all of those adjustments when you're done and I dont. You do it out of the car, and I have to fight with it inside the door. I'm not gonna say one way is better than the other. We both get the job done. We just go about it in different ways. Peace, brother! :p
 

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Let's call the calling off off

You are absolutely right about each of us finding the method of getting a job done that works best for us. My reply wasn't intended to knock your method, but to point out another approach.

I think the biggest difference may be in how long the window has been loose in the channel. If it's just happened and everything was set up right before, your in-the-door method might well be the easiest and best way to do the job. If, on the other hand, the window glass has been rattling around down there for a while, odds are the alignment and regulator adjustments will be out of whack anyway, in which case you're probably better off to start from scratch. I will admit, however, that getting that dang window back in with the channels attached is a job I'd rather not have to do very often!

I'll take a peace of that too, brother. :D

Keep on Cattin'!

Steve
 

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Steve,

What? You don't fix your baby as soon as something breaks? ;)

If you think that we are fussy, you oughta see my wife with her 70 Mach 1.... Now I have to find out why her interior courtesy lights keep blowing fuses... :eek: I think that's why she married me -- so she would have a free mechanic she can badger. (Just kidding, Dear...)

In all fairness, her Mach is a 21k mile all original, untouched, unmodified, unrestored* car. It got a lot of serious looks when we took it to the big 30th anniversary Mustang show back in '94. People kept coming over to look at her car to see what was 'correct'. Her car was the only 70 Mach there that still had its original underhood insulation, battery cables, heater hoses, ignition wires, assembly line crayon marks... Not that her car is perfect, it has many factory 'oopsies' in its fit and finish. Quality wasn't Job 1 back then. BTW, we don't believe in showing in Concours class. Those perfectionist snobs who don't drive their cars to the show, those who have put $35,000 into a restoration, ... Her car is driven! Yes, we had to drive it in the rain from Cleveland to Charlotte. No, it wasn't you-can-eat-off-the-underside-of-the-car clean. So no, she didn't win anything.

*Unrestored- her car doesn't fit the Mustang Club guidlines for unrestored since she had two consecutive body panels repainted long ago to fix a key-job made by some adolecent jerk at a local cruise who didn't like that a girl had a better car than he did. At that time (1983), she had just bought the car the week before and it had only 5700 original miles on the ticker. If she would have found out who had done it, she would have torn him limb from limb, literally!

But I digress.

Toe-MAH-toe! :p
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the advice which has been much appreciated.

Still haven't quite made up my mind which method to use though, as I can see the advantages of both ways of doing it.

My search for 3M Channel Bond over here has so far been unsuccessful so I may have to take up the offer of getting hooked up to good stuff!

Cheers

Chris
 

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Chris, I recommend the method of outside of the car. Just be sure to glue it in the same location as it was from the factory. The reason I say that is I glued my drivers side in while it was in the car and I didn't get it glued in exactly the original location. A few years later(last week) I changed the door on my car (it was rusty) and the new door had tinted glass in so I had to change the glass. Getting the glass out of the new door was no problem, But when I tried to get the glass out of my old door it was. There is not much room for error when you glue the glass back on the metal. As I found out I almost had the glass out when it happened. BOOM BABY!! GLASS EVERYWHERE!! Guess I need another door glass. It doesn't really matter which method you use. All that matters is you get it very very close to the factory location! If you don't you either can't get it out or you can't get it in. Or you can break it trying and that SUCKS!:cry:
 

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Glass glass glass

Catz the glass dilema really is best addressed when out of car and all marks are aligned to give proper tolerances for alignment once glass is re-installed.The glue I use is windshield ureathane adhesive not sealant but adhesive and allows for flex.The bottom of channel must be clear of old glue and ends must not drop away from bottom of glass or alignment will be impossible.I also glue glass "tipped" inwards in channels and then next day slide glass frt thru frt opening on top of door and then back of glass channel thru weatherstrip hole on an angle. Admittedly this is a bit difficult at times but must be how Ford did it.If window fuzzy is in place ,can make very difficult to install or remove glass from door.Course once glass is in door and fastened to guides what I do is losely set all positions get in car and move glass into proper sealed position and then lock all adjustments from there.Leave glass part way down till you are in the car so you don't break it getting in.
 

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what i used.....

this of course happened to me. i wound up using a panel bonding adhesive that was ment for hanging 1/4 panels. it worked fine, only that i misaligned the drivers side window and i have a gap there now. ooops. but its in there like it was welded in. from what i hear, its about 100 for the stuff. but i got it free. he he he
 

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un bonding

I gently warm the area up w/propane torch to soften adhesive and then pull chanel off the bottom of glass. Not too much heat or you will need another glass. Just warm the channel metal back and forth till starts to smell.Care full,Catz ya Ray:)
 
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