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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

Back in the day I had a Cougar with huge 50's and cragars. The back end was jacked up via air shocks (I bought it that way). Now with my new cougar, I really want the option of stuffing some meat back there but the ability to get the ride height back down to stock for certain things. Am I out of my mind for thinking air shocks are ok? My old car back then did just fine like this, but I imagine that's not at all what they are designed for. If I do go this way, do I need to change out shackles or anything too? Can I change shocks myself by crawling under the car in my garage or do I need a lift (I will research this too, just figured I'd ask).

If this is all wrong, how to I get it up a bit higher to stick some wider tires under there?

Thanks!

Calbert
 

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I have air shocks on mine (installed by one of the PO) and have 1 cracked rear shocktower as a result, which has been fixed and reinforced btw.
As long as you do not overinflate them, I don't think you'll have any issues, I sure don't.

You could of course reinforce the top plate before going air shocks for some extra assurance.
 

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Here, enjoy this lovely image of my rear upper shock mount from when I got my cougar. Im still getting ready to put the new mount in. IMG_2863.jpg
 

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if you don't want air shocks and want the tire to fit in the wheel well. First option is the use a rim with a different offset to get a wider tire. Refer to the sticky thread and wheel/tire combinations. Second option is go to a three or four link rear suspension eliminating the leaf spring which allows a higher offset wheel to fit in the wheel well. Third option is narrow the rear end and mini tubs to give you the widest tire option. I have option 2 on the race car.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you! So, I understand what the offset number measures, but I need some further context if you don't mind: A larger offset seems like it would push the tires toward the center of the car, where they might rub on the inside. So a shorter offset should mean that the tires stick out past the wheel wells, is that correct? So I need to worry about offset in both directions, right? Too large and it will rub inside, and too small and it will rub outside? So if I jack up the car a bit with air shocks, and let the tires go past the fender lip, having too small of an offset won't matter, correct? The reason I'm asking is there is a set of used rims for sale but I think the offset is small (seller couldn't measure for me). If I'm going with air shocks, I don't need to know HOW small the offset is, but it matters how large if they are too deep. Do I have that right? I see notes in the forums that "about a 4 inch offset is good" but those are people who are trying to stay inside the wheel well (I think). Thanks!
 

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if you don't want air shocks and want the tire to fit in the wheel well. First option is the use a rim with a different offset to get a wider tire. Refer to the sticky thread and wheel/tire combinations. Second option is go to a three or four link rear suspension eliminating the leaf spring which allows a higher offset wheel to fit in the wheel well. Third option is narrow the rear end and mini tubs to give you the widest tire option. I have option 2 on the race car.
Brian,

Love the picture! Can you elaborate on your rear suspension set-up and wheel and tire specs?

Thanks.
Andrew
 
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