Mercury Cougar Owners banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
519 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
First off let me just state that I didn't buy my Cougar with 'investment' in mind. I bought my Cougar so I could take on a restomod project and have fun. :D

Secondly, let me also state that I am hooked and I'm having fun and this board only adds to that fun! I'm learning a lot from you guys :D

What I don't understand is how come Cougars are selling for so darn cheap! This seems to be more true for the 67's and 68's Standard and XR-7's but when compared to Camaros, Firechickens and Mopars they tend to be selling for much less for cars that look much better.

I understand the factors that drive down the price of a car such as rust, wreckage and so on and I also realize that Cougar GT's and GT-E and so on are not exactly cheap unless they're in a pile.

What's the deal?:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
i'll take the first stab...

the most important factor in the price of anything is the size of the market. how many people want to buy it?

the second most important factor is availability. how many are there for sale?

for classic cars, the second question is complex because you have to take the condition, availability of parts and location of the car and buyer into consideration. in many areas of the country, there aren't a large number of qualified mechanics and body specialists. i know, because i'm in one of those areas. that means if you want to own a classic, you have to either know how to do the restoration yourself or buy one already restored. if the car is in california and you are on the east coast, you have a transportation problem. if the car isn't drivable, it isn't worth the cost of transporting. and if it is drivable, you have to put three thousand miles on it to get it home.

how this relates to your question is in the number of camaros, mustangs (which you didn't mention,) and firebirds that were made in the first place. they all hugely outsold the cougar. the numbers of these cars out there mean the availability is good and they are being sold all over the country. the number of people who want these cars is as great today as it was in the sixties and seventies.

look at the number of movies and tv shows that had mustangs, camaros, and firebirds featured. how many had cougars? the cougar, though we here all know what a superior vehicle it was, was not as popular. there aren't as many people who want them today.

mopars are a different story. i don't think they outsold the cougar by that much on a model to model basis, though in total they probably did. but they were made for one purpose - to go fast as hell and look cool doing it. and that is something that still sells today. some cougars were made to go fast, some to be cushy. they had an identity crisis in the middle years that confused the market. and that hurts the sale and the price today.

i'm sure i left out a bunch, but someone else can take over now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Seeing that i`m in the market for an early Cougar that`s good news for me! I personally don`t buy cars for investments either,I just love to fix them up and drive them. I`d rather have a low production model of something,than a high one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
unfortunately for you, 68,

the oldest ones are the higher priced. they were real muscle cars so the demand is a little higher.

still, a 67 or 68 cougar is a heck of a lot less than the same year stang or camaro.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,691 Posts
I disagree!!!!!!!!!

73XR-7owner, I disagree.

The Cougar was always a solid #3 in sales behind the Mustang and Camaro. It outsold Firebird, Baracuda, Javelin every year 67-73. Challenger too except for it's debut year of 1970. Even more importantly it's market share increased as the market grew more competitive. In 73 it was over 50% of Mustang sales, while in 67 it was about 1/3.

As for values, you need to consider a lot of variables.

1) Desirability and Rarity are the most important. Ford sold a gazillion 65-66 Mustangs. But a common 6 cylinder coupe isn't worth as much as a rare K code convertible. It was popular then and is still the 'Blue Chip' 60's collectible today.

2) Body styles. 67-68 Cougar came in only one body style. (OK two if you count the bench seat code!) No convertibles. Converts will command 25-50% higher values than their coupe counterparts. Except for Javelin they all had convertible versions. 2 dr HTs are always the 2nd most popular. If you factor out convertible 67-68 Firebirds you'll find the prices are very similar on the bread and butter coupes.

3)Engines. Big block Cougar prices, especially 427 or 428CJ are right up there. The 390 isn't as much because it's not as rare and it's image suffered in the street when new. Why Ford put in a mild cam, a little carb and restrictive exhaust manifolds is puzzling, especially when there were Camaro 396s, Firebird 400s, 383, 440 and Hemi Mopars running around. Don't get me wrong, 390s are great engines, but Ford put a station wagon engine in a small car while the others had detuned race engines. But to say about Mopars "they were made for one purpose - to go fast as hell and look cool doing it" is grossly overstated. You could get a 6 cylinder Baracuda or Challenger after all! The 318 wasn't a big deal either. The 340 was a great small block though.

4) The Market. The market since the late 80's has looked for the most outrageous. The 59 Caddy Eldo convertible went from a $10K collectible to $40K+ almost overnight. Why? Because of it's flamboyant fins. Even the 58-60 Lincoln are coming up in value, due to their "let's out do Cadillac style."

Hemi 'anythings' have gone through the roof. A 69 Hemi Daytona that wouldn't sell when it was new is now getting $100K. Why? Because of the Hemi mystique and the outrageous aerodynamics. The same thing for COPO Chevy's.
But a Buick GS 455 Stage 1 is just as fast, but it doesn't have the image, it's too understated.

Beauty and elegance doesn't sell well, sad to say. The perceived 'instant classics' such as the 56-57 Mark II, 63-65 Riviera, Avanti, 66-67 Toronado and 67-68 Cougars have done OK. But nothing like the gaudy "look at me!" cars. The investors still have an affect on the hobby today.

Like most of us, I'd love a 68 GT-E, but I think the Cougar with the most potential is a 69-70 SCJ 428 Eliminator, with the loudest paint (yellow, blue, orange). Too bad they never made an Eliminator convertible with a 427 SOHC!!!!!!!!


Tim B
1969 XR7 428 CJR convertible
http://members.aol.com/timbrands/index.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Looking at the Big Picture

While it is true that classic Cats aren't yet bringing the big bucks we see being squandered on other Pony Cars, the situation is improving--if you consider rising prices an improvement. Each quarter for the past few years, TCCN has published the NADA price guide classic Cougar values (thanks to Frank Bowers), and each of those quarters has seen an increase in the value of our Cats. Seven years ago, for example, $5,500 was a high price to pay the original owner for my '69 XR-7. Today the NADA value is more than twice what I paid for the car originally (not counting the $8,000 I've put into the car since then).

I ask you to consider, however, if increases in Cougar values are really a good thing for our hobby. Rising car prices are an indication that Cougars are gaining popularity. With that increasing popularity goes an increase in the demand for new, used, NOS, OEM, and reproduction parts. According to the law of supply and demand, increased demand means higher prices. Unless you happen to be in the classic Cougar parts business, I don't see any reason to celebrate higher prices for parts that are becoming harder to find.

What's worse, the rising popularity of classic cars among those who don't know a 9/16" deep well socket from a PDA stylis is increasing the demand for "turnkey" Cougars--Cats that are fully restored and ready to drive--until a 30 year old part breaks. These are the fools who will drive the auction price of a 1969 grille center piece up to $676 on eBay (that really happened!). Read the article on Classic Cougar Parts Supplier Prices in the TCP magazine feature archive to find out what kind of effect an auction price like that has on what you'll pay the next time you need a part. Read the article, but I'll tell you in advance, you ain't gonna like it.

About the only good thing about the increasing demand for Cougars is that it's encouraging some manufacturers to look more seriously at producing repop Cat parts. If somebody starts manufacturing good quality wheel well moldings, for example, it would be a definite plus for our hobby. So far, however, that hasn't happened.

So call me old fashioned, but I preferred the days when a rust free driver could be picked up for less than a grand, and you could spend the day at your local U-Pull-It and come away with a whole trunkload of useable or restorable parts. Unfortunately, I'm afraid those days are long gone.

Keep on Cattin'!

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
694 Posts
I have just gotten back into the 67/68 cougars within the past year.....am picking up another this weekend! I can say with certainty that when I had my 68 XR7 at age 18 roughly 17 years ago I couldn't find anything for cougars when compared to mustangs........that has been the greatest part about getting back into them again!
Steve is right, though, I wanted a nice grille/nose/center for one of my cougars and on ebay recently the piece went for 65.00 , maybe that isn't as bad as his example and obviously to someone it was worth that. I was getting madder by the minute as I put in each bid and it kept on going......I would prefer the prices stayed low.......I don't really care about the cougars being as popular as the mustang.....that might be one of the things that drew me to them in the first place. I also have a neighbor who is a well known XR7-G owner here in the midwest.
The bottom line if you shop for a car or parts is that it is only worth as much as someone will pay for it.......Keith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
AHEM!

"those who don't know a 9/16" deep well socket from a PDA stylis..." i resemble that remark!

but i know what you mean. market conditions should provide its own answer to your complaint, though. as the price of the cars rise, the demand will fall, and as ownership of them increases, the availability of parts will improve. an increase in availability will either lead to a decline in parts prices or higher values for the finished cars.

if you plan never to sell your car, i guess this will hurt your wallet even if it improves your car. if you sell it though, you should get more for it.

this is getting awfully close to calling it "an investment..."
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top