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Discussion Starter #1
Is there anyone around who's experienced in supercharging engines?
I'm wondering what kind of blueprinting I should do in order to be able to run a supercharged 289.
I found some info on the topic at the Holley website and they said it's necessary to get forged pistons, stainless steel pistonrings, heavy duty fasteners for connecting rods and main bearing caps and o-ringed head gaskets when running boost levels over 12 psi.
Besides that I need the valve seats machined in order to provide better cooling.
When I do all that and get the compression ratio down to 8:1 and ofcourse have the components checked for cracks, what kind of maximum boost can I think about? The blower I've seen can provides gears for up to 24 psi, but that's a bit much I think.
I'm going to (re)build the engine myself and can spend around $4500 on it and some more in the longer term...
Anyone ideas about this? (I'm not swapping for another engine, for I'm interested in blowing this one)

Thanks,
Matthijs
 

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I will asume that you will be reving this up to 6500 or better so ballancing is in order.
Double valve springs to avoid valve float, either solid lifters or anti pumpup hydrolics plus hardened push rods and guide plates.

Stud girtle to help hold bottom end together, and windage tray to keep oil available at pickup or larger oil pan.

You can get much more radical with this and spend unlimited money to make it do better. I just addressed holding it together.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Swamper,

Thanks for the info.
I'm planning on an rpm range of 3000-6000, but I've no idea on what the effect of boost pressure is on the final C/R in the cylinder.
Now what I've seen so far is the following:

Cam:
http://www.cranecams.com/master/apps/ford14.htm

Blower:
http://www.holley.com/HiOctn/ProdLine/Products/AMS/SC/SCK/77-174_FSBP.html

I'm aiming for a streetable car, which might pay an occasional visit to the strip someday. Thing is I've heard of guys with tiny little engines (2L) and turbo's running boost pressures of about 16 psi. What I'd like to know what is commonly considered as extreme boost and how to figure out what boost goes best with a specific application?


Cheers!
Matthijs
 

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One thing that you definitely need to consider is:
the rest of the car.
A friend of mine has a '65-ish Ranchero with a Paxton supercharger on his 289. His exact reply when I asked him how much he got the supercharger:
"I got it for $2500. That's the most expensive $2500 I've ever spent." Basically after he installed it, he then had to strengthen his otherwise-fine C4 tranny, replace his one-legged differential with a limited slip, then replace his axles after his limited slip diff. destroyed them.... just driving on the street.
He absolutely loves the power, but he says we would have definitely planned the rest of the drivetrain better from the beginning.
That said, keep my informed! I wanna do it too! :D
 

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somebody is making the four bolt mains for the windsor as well but not shure who but take it to the machine shop and have them drill and tap used with a stud girdle great for holding that bottom end together but not sure if they fit a 289.
here is the what is on the mustang and fords website
If a super-screamer Windsor engine is on your project agenda, but the two-bolt mains have youa little nervous, you can relax. You won’t have to scour the woods for a Boss 302 block because now Milodon offers these four-bolt main caps to fit your mill. The outer bolts are splayed or angled for extra strength and protection against cap walk. Just have your machine shop drill and tap the outer holes, and align bore the crank saddle. Contact Info: Milodon, Dept. MF, 20716 Plummer St., Chatsworth; CA 91311, (818) 407-1211.
 

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Matthijs,
For the camshaft you need to contact the technical department of the company you decide to use. The supercharger needs a cam especially ground for that application. The ones in the catalogs are not suitable.

Intake valve springs need to be very stiff when using a lot of boost. Because of the stiff springs it is best to use a solid lift camshaft, it will be less trouble than a hydraulic in this application. Hydraulic lifters have a hard time dealing with super stiff springs.
 

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Matthijs
Put enough power in there to drive down to Italy, boost yourself over the Mediteranean Sea, do a quick dash down Africa, and come say Hi to us.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
72cat said:
Matthijs
Put enough power in there to drive down to Italy, boost yourself over the Mediteranean Sea, do a quick dash down Africa, and come say Hi to us.
Now that's what I was planning on putting in my '90 Firebird (was to be a K.I.T.T. replica), but she's no longer with us.
For the power I'm planning on, it might be wiser to drive down to spain and hop over there (shorter jump you know...).

Royce,
It starts to sound like a longer term project already... What I'm wondering is can I start of running low pressure boost and upgrade when things are getting ready for it (like drive train and all)? It's for now that I'm getting ready for rebuilding and want to make sure that I do it in such a way that I can supercharge the engine later on. So what I'd like to know is all I should consider when rebuilding the cylinder block with regards to reinforcing and all, so that I can gradually go and add more power, without hoisting out that darn block everytime.

Cheers!
Matthijs
 

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The Paxton was the most commonly used setup for 289. I don't know if I have any information on them at home. I have seen them advetised but can't remember where.

As mentioned above there is a lot of additional stress put on drive train. 9" rear is a must.

I didn't mention screw in rocker studs earlier but they are needed to deal with stronger springs.
The lock wire head gasgets seal well but will not give as a pressure releaf. It then is your lower end that breaks (i would rather replace head gasgets than replace short block).
 

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"For the power I'm planning on, it might be wiser to drive down to spain and hop over there (shorter jump you know...)."

Sorry, my geography's a bit rusty, I'm amazed I got the sea right.
 

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the lower compression you need to run the boosted power will be a dog until you bolt on the super charger. If you were state side i would suggest just building one for now then install the completeed engine with blower together. SC are nice but can be a pain especially when you compound the fact you live across an ocean. If your looking for HP look to the windsor 427 from PAW it costs 2500.00 for a short block and loads of tourque and none of the SC headaches. and at that price your well on your way since thats what the super charger cost. bolt on the manifold carb and heads of your choice and your done. if you spend the 2500.00 on the SC you still have to pay for the engine rebuild.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
72cat said:
"For the power I'm planning on, it might be wiser to drive down to spain and hop over there (shorter jump you know...)."

Sorry, my geography's a bit rusty, I'm amazed I got the sea right.
I could also take the detour to Egypt and hop over the Suez channel (there might even be a bridge there).

Back to topic---
What's the better blower? Roots type or centrifugal? I really like the style of a roots blower you know...
Besides that, will there be room for a centrifugal when I hook up my p/s and airco?

Cheers!
Matthijs
 
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