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Discussion Starter #1
I have two more engines to build next summer, before I leave. I have a running 302 in my 67, and I have an engine kit I bought for it back in 05. That motor will not change, as I already have all the pieces.
My other engine, my 69 351W, is still in the air. I have gone back and forth over just a freshen up build (.030 over pistons, bearings, trick flow heads ( PN#5140002 that I already have) some comp cam kit http://www.summitracing.com/CCA-CL35-246-3/ ~ish.
For this build, I already have the TF heads, a Holley 670 street avenger carb, (I have vintage Holley Le mans 715 for the 69 in reserve), full MSD ignition, Air Gap intake manifold. The car has 3.89 gears, and I will be running a 255/50/16 wheel and tire combo. I also have a complete hydraulic clutch set up waiting and a T5 transmission.
PLan B, for better, is 408 stroker kit. Better heads, (AFR 205~ish) RETRO FIT ROLLER CAM KIT. Tremec TKO trans.
The point behind the question is, are there any better retro roller cam kits available? Over SBF tech, there is nothing but hatred for a smaller base circle camshaft.
However, looking at my success ratio for my 289 in the 68, the roller cam conversion is looking better and better.
The 289 I have, and the 351 build in plan "A" are pretty similar. My 289 is fun to drive, in between failures. However, the 69 is my favorite, and therefor needs to be the baddest and best-est. I guess I am concerned about camshaft failure with the roller conversion as well.
Thoughts?
 

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Why not a solid roller?
Comp has some nice street roller grinds... And the lifters are much less expensive than the hyd. roller retrofit lifters.

If I were building a hyd. roller motor, I'd pick up a rebuildable late model roller motor from the junk yard. Loads of pickups and vans with roller (or roller-ready) blocks.
 

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Knuckle down and buy roller blocks so you can use the normal base circle cams. Or, just use a flat tappet and the right oil.

All the cool stuff that these cars did back in the day was with flat tappet cams. Nothing wrong with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The reason I'm thinking retro kit for the 69, is that all my other pieces fit that block height. If I had no engine, I would absolutely buy a roller block in today's world. There is no downside to a roller camshaft.
 

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I have a retrofit roller in my 393W. Went from a Hyd flat tappet X4262H to a retrofit hydraulic roller XR276RF-HR, both from Comp Cams. Nothing but good! Car is a full second quicker (about 100-ish more horsepower), and low-RPM streetability is still there as well. Not having to worry about compatible oils to avoid camshaft failure is a big peace of mind. Other than not having the 'best' lobe profiles available, I'd recommend them in a heartbeat! In fact, I'll be going retrofit hyd roller in my 351Cs, too!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That is some positive feedback for what I'm thinking about. My last TDY will pay for all this, so I have to get it right!
 

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Remember that it's always an option to pile all those hot rod parts up until you can afford to blow them up, and just run a stock engine in that car.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The engine in my 69 already needs a rebuild. I'm just trying to decide how to spend on the rebuild.
This would all be much easier if I knew how long I was going to live.....
 

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Why not a solid roller?
Comp has some nice street roller grinds... And the lifters are much less expensive than the hyd. roller retrofit lifters.

If I were building a hyd. roller motor, I'd pick up a rebuildable late model roller motor from the junk yard. Loads of pickups and vans with roller (or roller-ready) blocks.
Are you saying the retrofit roller kits are not good? I wanted to do the retro kit on my rebuild some two or so years ago but cost to much. I went with fat tappet and only used ZDDP additive for break in with no problems yet.
 

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Are you saying the retrofit roller kits are not good? I wanted to do the retro kit on my rebuild some two or so years ago but cost to much. I went with fat tappet and only used ZDDP additive for break in with no problems yet.
No, a solid roller is a less expensive alternative to the hydraulic roller. Solid roller lifters work in any block, much cheaper (and lighter). Comp street roller cams are ground on cast iron billet so the stock iron distributor gear is OK (no expensive steel/bronze/poly gear is required) and stock length pushrods would probably work.
 

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No, a solid roller is a less expensive alternative to the hydraulic roller. Solid roller lifters work in any block, much cheaper (and lighter). Comp street roller cams are ground on cast iron billet so the stock iron distributor gear is OK (no expensive steel/bronze/poly gear is required) and stock length pushrods would probably work.
The Comp Cams retrofit hydraulic rollers don't require a special distributor gear either!
 

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I'd just go retrofit - like Milo says, it's pretty streetable, it even takes some track abuse. If I were building an all out race car I'd go roller. But youve already got the parts so I say "smoke 'em if ya got 'em. Just be tedious during the build and check your tollerances like your life depended on it. You will be fine if you do.
 

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Retrofit hydraulic rollers (in fact all hydraulic rollers) are pretty much limited to 6200rpm (+/- 200rpm) by the shear mass of the valvetrain, so there's no biggie there. What you have to concern yourself with is the rest of your build. Stock rod bolts, even ARP replacements, are only good to 6300 or so at best. Higher than that and you're into aftermarket rods and forged crank territory. FWIW, my 393W with the XR276RF-HR is pretty much topped out at 6000rpm - at least that's where my best ETs are found. Any higher RPM and I actually go slower! Now where's the downside again??? I'd much rather have lots of 'cushion' in my build than be living on the ragged edge!
 

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Stock rod bolts, even ARP replacements, are only good to 6300 or so at best. Higher than that and you're into aftermarket rods and forged crank territory.
Good thing I didn't know that when I was spinning OEM 302's to 7000rpm. :)
 

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Good thing I didn't know that when I was spinning OEM 302's to 7000rpm. :)
Ditto. Back in my early days them there were exotic racing parts!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
As I get older, I really want to get one of my cars painted, and be "done". (We all know that NEVER happens!) But it is a goal. Maybe I will balance it out, and not stroke the motor, and use a roller cam...But, the difference is cost isn't really that much! AAARRRGGGHHHHHH!!!
What to do??
 

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What to do?
Build the cheapest engine you can and get it on the road. Then, build a performance engine when you can and swap it over a weekend.
 
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