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Discussion Starter #1
I recently moved from AL to KS and and decided to fix my rear wheel well rubbing issue before I start my new job. I had gas shocks put on in 2008 when I bought the car replacing the worn out air ones. I also had bigger tires put on the back (205/70/15) and they rub on bumps or when theres weight in the car.

The local muffler shop suggested that I go back to air shocks because they're adjustable to whatever condition I may come across. I on the other hand don't have much experience with air and would like some of your thoughts. I'm skeptical as to the ride height they would give me in the back and how long could I expect them to last?
 

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205/70/15 tires aren't all that big. I would guess your rear springs are worn out. You might consider going that route instead.

Yeah, the air-shocks will cure the problem and there are guys on here who will advise against them. Heck, I've run them for YEARS in other configurations on my car. How long they last is all based on how they're installed, the routing of the lines and how strong your floorpan is where they bolt up.

On last note, I tend to steer away from "muffler shops" for anything other than exhaust work.
 

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Contributing Sr Motorhead
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I'm assuming you mean that the tires are hitting the wheel lip, right? If that is the case, I wouldn't change either shocks or springs - I'd change wheels for ones with a different offset!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Local Hero,
I made a mistake on my tire size they're 225/70/15's. My rear leaf springs were installed in Aug of 2008 shortly after I got the car, the PO had lowered the car to about 6 inches of total clearance. And yes I mean the tires are rubbing against the wheel lip on bumps. I like my wheels so changing them is out, plus I don't want the extra expense of new ones and storing a 3rd set of rims. (I'm a little bit of a hoarder) I did make a feeble attempt to roll the wheel wells but how much can you do with a 2x4 wedged between the tire and well? I'll check a few more body shops and hopefully one of them can give me an alternative solution, thanks for the suggestilons.
 

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I seen an article long ago about rolling wheel well lips in a HOTROD mag. They used a baseball bat that rooled along as the tire turned. It looked pretty straight foward but I would investigate alittle before I tried it. My luck the bat would push out the whole quarte panel!! Do you have any pics of the tire/quarter panel 225's are not huge so it must be an offset issue.
 

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I agree, it must be an offset issue. 225s aren't terribly big either. So if you're dead set on the rims you have, alternative measures are going to be necessary; one of which might be the going back to air shocks.

I rolled the rear lips on my daily driver to fit 275/60/15s on 15X10 rims. I took an aluminum baseball bat and wedged it between the tire and the fender lip. Then I had my wife slowly drive the car forward as I pried down on the bat while it rolled due to contact from the tire sidewall from the rear of the fender lip to the front. It took about 3 or 4 tries per side. But it didn't even crack the paint on the lips.

I'm sure a google search will turn up some sort of published article on how to do it.
 

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I bet if you called around to various bodyshops, you'll find someone willing to roll the quarters for you for a few bucks or a six pack. The guy who painted my car had a contraption just for this-- basically it's an arm that bolts onto the wheel lugs and has a hard rubber roller at the end which gets extended to match the radius of the tire. Basically you just move it to and fro a few times and it bends the wheel lip out of the way exactly where the tire would normally hit. Personally, I'd try the baseball bat method but I don't blame folks for being scared of that approach. It sounds kinda crude but it essentially does just what the contraption I described does.

EDIT: here's one from eastwood. http://www.eastwood.com/ew-fender-roller-w-instruction.html A bit pricey but you could always start a little side business rolling fenders...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I found another shop that knows old cars. They suggested that I simply add a set of 2in blocks on the rear end to give me the clearance I need. Thats the route I'm going to take since I really don't like the idea of throwing away 1 yr old shocks just to go back to air.
 

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I found another shop that knows old cars. They suggested that I simply add a set of 2in blocks on the rear end to give me the clearance I need. Thats the route I'm going to take since I really don't like the idea of throwing away 1 yr old shocks just to go back to air.
They are steering you WRONG! Blocks on the rearend will LOWER the car and make your problem worse.
 

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For vehicles with the rear leaf springs mounted on top of the axle (most pickup trucks), adding blocks will raise the body with respect to the wheels. For vehicles with the springs mounted below the axle (such as our Cats), adding blocks will lower the body.
 
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