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Long story short, finally decided to bring my 69 cougar convertible that's been parked in the garage for 20+ years back to life. Body overall is in pretty good shape. Floor panels and a few spots in the bottom of the doors and quarters need some attention. (Might be more once I start sanding...). I'm just starting to do my homework as a pretty handy DIY guy with no welding experience. It seems like my 3 options are using body panel adhesive, taking it to a pro (or buddy who can weld) or learn to weld myself. I'm not looking for a show quality car, just a fun weekend ride/semi daily driver. I'm thinking just cutting out the rust and cleaning it up, getting it all prepped, then take it to someone experienced to weld it all up, then bring it home to start grinding and bodywork. But I have other vehicles that have rust/rocker panel issues that I could justify making a small investment and learning how to weld. But then I get confused by flux vs mig vs tig and what a harbor freight-esqe 110v welder could actually pull off for body work.

Any advice to help me think this thru would be appreciated. Most patches would be only a few inches, except for floor pans, which I won't know the damage until I pull out the interior.
 

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Sounds like myself 5 years ago. I boils down to how adventurous you are. I had the same situation with my vert and just decided to go for it and learn how to weld...the hard way. I bought a Hobart 140 MIG welder and learned to use solid core wire and shielding gas. Make sure you use shielding gas as it makes all the difference in the work. Hindsight tells me I should have bought a TIG welder since it gives more control, but I couldn't spend the money back then. Look at on-line videos for welding sheet metal. Get a bunch of scrap metal the same thickness as the car metal and just play around before attacking the car. If you want a show car, get someone else that knows how to weld to do it. There are a lot of little tricks with welding so videos help...or get to know someone that does know how to weld. If the repair work is truly minimal, it may be worth just paying someone to do it. The estimates I got made it well worth buying the welder learning. I also have done exhaust systems, customer brackets, and even repairs on my truck and trailer with the welder. I would avoid the harbor freight stuff unless money is really tight. I haven't heard how their newer combination welders are holding up, but with past history, getting repairs on those items is not good. Good luck.
 
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