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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, after 15 years of thinking I was going to get started on wrapping up restoring my 68 XR7 that I started in 1998, thwarted by trying to start a business, having kids, building a garage, etc. I'm finally moving forwards.

Going to post up as I go for any advice, suggestions, heckling, whatever.

Here's the cat as my dad bought it in '86 when I was 15 and just getting my license.


I got to drive it in highschool and when he wanted to sell it I worked to buy it from him. Five more years of New England driving certainly took its toll. I took it off the road since and in 1998 began what I thought was going to be a year or two of restoring.

No surprise, a 28 year old with nothing but optimism and not much money I didn't exactly get far. But I managed to learn some welding skills and replace a rotted left quarter and floorpans.

Anyways, fast forward, lots of bodywork, scraping off layers tar-based undercoating, managed to get things repainted topside by a local master--but due to timing I didn't have a chance to first paint the underside (doing things backwards is my specialty) Paint came out pisser tho!



I'm now looking to clean up the flash rust on the bottom, add some sub-frame connectors, prime, paint, and seal it all up so I can get on with the rebuild. I have a few cool things planned, a mostly faithful restoration with a few styling twists.

So, being in my 40's I don't want to crawl underneath to scrape, blast and weld. And being a cheap yankee I didn't want to buy a rotisserie. So I built one out of $40 lumber and fasteners based on some things I saw online. Surprisingly easy and was able to tip it up with a buddy.





So, that's where I'm at now, I'll post as things progress.
 

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Nice!

Ya, life gets in the way sometimes. The important thing is you still have it and still love it. I'm in the same boat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nice!

The important thing is you still have it and still love it.
Yeah, pretty psyched to have held on to it all these years. Countless times it would have been easy to part with it and save storage costs, or getting it towed here and there moving everything in boxes. I'm pretty sure I have friends who roll their eyes "oh, right, that classic car you have that we're always hearing about" whenever I mention it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I used a free 3D tool called Google Sketchup to find my dimensions for the wooden rotisserie, I was able to import a 68 Mustang model for referencing things and guestimating the center of gravity so that it would tip easy. If anyone wants I can share the file. For wood I only needed four 2x6x8's, two 2x4x8's, one 3/4" CDX ply sheet, and 12 carriage bolts. Took a couple hours to build and while I used a buddy to tip, I can actually tip it myself without much effort. Of course all disclaimers to safety, do it at your own risk etc. etc. I'm just sharing for those interested since it worked for me.

 

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Looks good so far and I like the rotisserie. Life definitely can sneak up on ya. I started mine with one kid and when am done, will have three kids. That wasn't in the schedule...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Got the flash rust off from my old welding using a grinder and twisted wire brush, some spot media blasting to follow in the nooks and crannies. Note to my 28 year old self: learn to do butt-welds. Oh well, I don't plan on getting compliments on the underside, so long as it never rusts out again. Luckily the frame rails are quite solid, did a lot of poking around for weakness there. Anyone have recommendations for undercoating? I'm currently planning an epoxy primer topped with U-Pol Raptor bed liner for some protection and sound deadening.

 

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Love the rotisserie , Car looks great from the pics.

thanks
pat
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Looks good so far and I like the rotisserie. Life definitely can sneak up on ya. I started mine with one kid and when am done, will have three kids. That wasn't in the schedule...
That's sounding very familiar Brian!
 

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I used a free 3D tool called Google Sketchup to find my dimensions for the wooden rotisserie, I was able to import a 68 Mustang model for referencing things and guestimating the center of gravity so that it would tip easy. If anyone wants I can share the file. For wood I only needed four 2x6x8's, two 2x4x8's, one 3/4" CDX ply sheet, and 12 carriage bolts. Took a couple hours to build and while I used a buddy to tip, I can actually tip it myself without much effort. Of course all disclaimers to safety, do it at your own risk etc. etc. I'm just sharing for those interested since it worked for me.

I LIKE it!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Subframe connectors from Global West showed up. They fit quite well but were a bit too snug at the rear, I just needed to compress the frame rails about 1/16" using a beefy C-clamp to get them to slide on. These connectors are very good quality. Next up is some final clean-up and then on to epoxy primer and Raptor bed liner so I can roll this thing back on its haunches.





 

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Wow those are nice.....good fit really. Love the easy rotisserie also!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
G
Maybe it is just me but those connectors look like they will be hanging real low on the front .... ????
On the front they are about 1/2" off the floor pans, and sit shallower than the frame rails they attach to. Towards the rear they become the lowest member of the chassis by almost 3". I think of it as muffler protection. The third photo is the rear for reference.
 

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I really like the look of those supports, but also noticed that they seem to sit low in the back. Wondering if it would be visible. My car will be sitting a bit higher in the back than most, wife just likes that look. I do want to install supports, but not in any hurry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Wondering if it would be visible.
I'll roll it back over and shoot some photos. From normal standing position I doubt they are visible. They sit inboard of the leaf springs so I'd guess less visible than traction bars at least.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Figured I wouldn't waste internet ink with all the little grinding/scraping and general cleanup I've been doing on the bottom prepping for undercoating. But in the meantime I'm thinking ahead to putting the engine and suspension back in. Looking for any advice on the fit of the components I'm planning on installing. I have the original 302 completely rebuilt (306 now) with an RV cam, hardened valve seats, hypereutectic pistons, basically built for good low to mid end improvement, but I plan on a winter 347 project on a late model 5.0 block next year so I'm going to set up the exhaust a little more with that in mind. Here's my engine compartment combo that I'd like advice on fit from those with experience:
- T5 conversion, cable clutch
- power brakes
- Borgeson Steering conversion (eliminating the non-integral power cylinder and valve)
- Hooker comp 6901 ceramic coated headers (to 2.5" exhaust thru magnaflows)
- Classic auto air AC (purchased several years ago)

If anyone sees a disconnect in that package I'm all ears. I have a set of Hi-po manifolds which would serve the current engine fine and keep things more open, but I don't want to redo the exhaust when get the 347 in there. Plus I've always wanted some longtube headers!
 

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Be sure that the headers are for a manual trans then. A/T headers wont work. Also a modern roller block will not have the mounting hole the old blocks have for the Z bracket (you need the adapter bracket), unless you got electric fuel pump and don't' want an oil dipstick - you need to go to an old style timing cover, remember the modern mills have internal 28 oz balance and the old ones are 50 Oz external....so watch your flywheel and harmonic balancer combo's. and the old balancers had 3 bolt pulleys (you can get new multi-fit ones though), and be careful of water pump rotation.....some had reverse. ;>P probably forgetting things.

Oh yeah, you need the old style rear sump oil pan and pickup.....
 
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