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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi y’all, I came up with a interesting way to run aftermarket 3 point seatbelts so there is minimum modification and no big ugly retractor. The set I got was the generic CJ Pony Parts $200 seat belt kit, I also had to buy two bolts from the hardware store for the top point of the belts that fit in the factory holes (would tell you what they were but I lost the bag). Other materials used were a wire coat hanger, 4 small machine screws with washers, locking washers, and nuts, a cheap cap style pen, gun lube, black plastic school folder, and the original seat belt hardware. One thing that will be different for y’all is the seats - mine are Chevy Monza Spyder seats so they had the extra loop by the headrest.
I purposely made the retractor mounting hole close to the rear torque box because I figured it would protect the opening somewhat from water and it would be a very strong area of the car.
For the belt roller thing I took a piece of wire hanger with half of a cheap ball point pen tube and bent it to resemble the thing you see in the picture, lubed it with the gun lube (don’t use much not trying to oil your belts) and screwed it down through two small holes I drilled. Note: one of the holes does go through the edge of the rear torque box flange.
The last part that really needs explanation is the folder - all I did was cut a piece off and fold it over the seat belt stapling it together (don’t staple the belt). I plan on securing it with a strong tape to the rear seat door card thing, all this piece does is stop the seat belt from rubbing on the door card or rear seat so it shouldn’t need to hold up to any strong force.
Everything else bolts to a factory location. Beware the top hole’s threads may not be great. I did sit on the rear seat and didn’t feel a belt retractor even when I sat on the far edge where no one would sit anyway.
The only concerns I have for this system is:
1. The retractor doesn’t have the strongest spring so when I take the belt out of the headrest clip on the seat it doesn’t like to retract all of the way to the top point unless you help it.
2. Your passenger could easily throw the buckle into the window when exiting if you don’t have a seatbelt clip on your headrest.
3. Because these retractors lock up easily, if someone yanks the belt hard they could rip the homemade belt roller out of the floor.
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Interesting approach.
I'd be interested to see how long the "wire hanger" (belt 90 deg pivot point under the seat) lasts when the seat belt is yanked by a 200# crash dummy in the seat slamming into the windshield at 60 MPH.
It would probably be more secure by mounting the retractor on a 90 deg bracket so it pulls straight up. Or making the belt follow a 90 deg guide with a polished round edge formed from 3/16" steel plate.
This setup results in a very long belt - it may stretch too far to keep a person from hitting the dash and windshield on impact.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Interesting approach.
I'd be interested to see how long the "wire hanger" (belt 90 deg pivot point under the seat) lasts when the seat belt is yanked by a 200# crash dummy in the seat slamming into the windshield at 60 MPH.
It would probably be more secure by mounting the retractor on a 90 deg bracket so it pulls straight up. Or making the belt follow a 90 deg guide with a polished round edge formed from 3/16" steel plate.
This setup results in a very long belt - it may stretch too far to keep a person from hitting the dash and windshield on impact.
I know the hanger will break in a wreck but I figured the retractor would still hold unless it’s a really bad wreck… If it’s that bad (rip the retractor out of the floor bad) then I figured I’d probably be dead anyway, it’s not like the thing has crumple zones or airbags. I didn’t know about the belt stretching though, I’ll keep that in mind.
The manufacturer’s instructions used 2 rivets to hold the supplied third point on to some 18 gauge sheet metal which I’m sure wouldn’t hold in a 60 mph accident.
I think both systems are equally bad and wouldn’t do any favors at highway speeds but at least in my case everything is hidden and out of the way for shows.
I am looking for other possibilities for pivots, I wasn’t too concerned about it though because all it does is stop the belt from rubbing on the seat. In a wreck I think the belt screwing up the rear seat is the least of my concerns.
I will definitely keep your suggestions in mind and will post pictures of modifications if I figure something out.
 
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