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I sure hope your "big dollop of moly grease" do not plug up the oil passages or pick up screen ...... It is not a recommended practice ....
 

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Discussion Starter #102
Re: Let's Redo the Three Oh Two

Actually the text in most camshaft installation instructions tells you not to prime the lifters. They should be installed empty, so that they will not apply full force to the camshaft for a few rotations of the engine. Also, it is easier to adjust hydraulic lifters while they are empty, because you can feel where they top out.
There must be different schools of thought on this. I closely followed a popular 302 rebuild book, which definitely says to prime the lifters, and my '68 Ford shop manual says the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #103
I sure hope your "big dollop of moly grease" do not plug up the oil passages or pick up screen ...... It is not a recommended practice ....
Well, it wasn't all that big, but it's definitely on there. The cam lobes and the lifters' "feet" got moly grease on them that was made for this purpose. The 302 rebuild book I used definitely stated to do this, as did a very recently released DVD on engine rebuilding that I must have watched and re-watched a dozen times. :)
 

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http://www.network54.com/Forum/74182/thread/1380587491/Assembly+lube

You need to read this forum discussion by what I consider some of the best FORD motor heads around .... Most of them, like me, make their living twisting wrench's and building motors for a living ....... So read it think about your "big dollop of moly grease" and when you fire up your little 1st time motor project if your oil filter,ports or screen plugs up and cooks your bearings ..... call the maker of the DVD you watched or book your reading and have him pay for it .......... bet you won't be so smart then ......
 

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Discussion Starter #105
Lube it up

http://www.network54.com/Forum/74182/thread/1380587491/Assembly+lube

You need to read this forum discussion by what I consider some of the best FORD motor heads around .... Most of them, like me, make their living twisting wrench's and building motors for a living ....... So read it think about your "big dollop of moly grease" and when you fire up your little 1st time motor project if your oil filter,ports or screen plugs up and cooks your bearings ..... call the maker of the DVD you watched or book your reading and have him pay for it .......... bet you won't be so smart then ......
Haven't checked the forum in a while and I see that I managed to stir up some emotions in this forum. Different opinions and experiences are what forums are about IMO. But getting kinda worked up about a forum post I'll never quite understand.


That link above has people on both sides - some like the moly-based lubes and others don't. I do try to do my homework before jumping into things, and fortunately for me I have a brother who has turned wrenches for a living for 30+ years, and a father who once did, and they give me advice and inspiration for this hobby. Admittedly I got carried away when I said I used a "big dollop" of the stuff, and I wouldn't recommend doing that because it wouldn't do anything helpful by swimming around in engine oil. But I did ensure that the cam lobes and lifter feet surfaces were thoroughly coated with it.


Here's a link from the Crankshaft Coalition which offers some thorough instruction for installing and breaking in cams. They recommend a moly-based lube on the lobes and lifter feet to help protect the cam and engine during the initial break in.


BTW, I'm definitely a first-time restorer, and it's 100% true that I have made my share of mistakes along the way - and I haven't reached my quota on screw-ups yet. Reader's of this thread beware! Don't assume I know the best way to do anything! I'm doing this to document this restoration roller coaster ride, not to pretend I'm an expert at it.


More pics and updates from my project coming soon...
 

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Discussion Starter #106
While I've Got the Engine Out...

I didn't realize at the time, but my project was about to snowball on me. With the engine out, there was some rust in both front frame rails and shock towers that I wanted to get taken care of. Turns out that the rust was much worse than I initially thought (isn't it always?). I decided that rather than mess with attempting to patch up the rusty old shock towers, I would replace them both with units from Dynacorn. But I figured the rails should be patch-able by someone who knows welding and who can do the tower replacements. These shock towers were very well made - a little heavier gauge than the originals and great fitting. I give them a big thumbs-up. At about $105 each, I think it was money well spent.
 

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Discussion Starter #107 (Edited)
Getting Some Professional Help

I feel EXTREMELY lucky to have crossed paths with a guy named Chris Slee who has a restoration shop not far from me. He got me a good deal on tow truck and the car went to his shop with the intention of patching the rails, maybe replacing one of the torque boxes, and definitely replacing the two shock towers. But that's quite not what happened...
 

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Discussion Starter #108 (Edited)
Rust - It's Always Worse than You Think It is

Chris started out on the passenger rail. The top of the rail under the shock tower was completely rusted through while the rest of the rail was solid except for on small patch near the firewall. Chris is seriously amazing with his metal work and welding.
Here you can see where he's cut out the old tower and has made the first part of the patch for the rusted out rail. This extends under the rail for strength.






He then capped the first patch to make it flush with the outer rail surfaces.
 

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Discussion Starter #109 (Edited)
Rust - It's Always Worse than You Think It is

Here the shock tower is welded in using the holes from the original spot welds.



Completed passenger side. Notice how nice the aprons look and how the rail patch is practically invisible. Great work, Mr. Slee.
 

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Discussion Starter #110 (Edited)
Rust - It's Always Worse than You Think It is

At this point, I'm a happy camper and things are going along as good or better than I expected.
But soon after Chris started on the driver's side, my phone rang, and Chris told me the rust in the rail was worse than the passenger side. I headed to his shop, and sure enough, it was real bad. The rail was rusted through in several places and paper-thin in others. The torque box had been badly patched and was useless. The floor pan on the driver's side was trashed. UGH. Man, I hate rust. I hadn't planned for all of this. I decided I was in this thing until the end, and we ordered a new frame rail, two torque boxes, and a patch panel for the floor. Chris and his welder got busy.
No more rusty torque box and driver's floor pan.



Out comes the old rail.

 

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Discussion Starter #113
Rust - It's Always Worse than You Think It is

New rail and shock tower in. Getting this right isn't easy. It takes careful measuring to make sure the rail is positioned correctly so that the suspension will fit correctly and the car can be aligned correctly. I made several measurements to check things out, and Chris absolutely nailed it. The replacement rail was an absolute perfect fit for the original, and included all of the correct holes included the threaded ones. And because it is also a Mustang part, it wasn't real expensive.

Looking back on all of this (this was July of 2013) I'm really glad I bit the bullet and got it fixed right. The new torque boxes and rail make me very comfortable about the structural integrity of the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #114
Rust - It's Always Worse than You Think It is

Here it is just before it came back home. I asked Chris to leave the coil springs out because the front suspension needs work. But that's another chapter in this story...
 

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OOF! Yeah that was some pretty ugly rot going on there......looks like she's in good hands though! Some guys haven't been happy withthe fit of the Dynocorn panels so it's good to hear they are working out so far.....
 

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Wow, I feel bad for you that's a lot of work. We all hate rust especially on these cars so don't feel out of place by any means. At that point I would have looked into a newer front end and got rid of the shock towers. But I don't know how much you are wanting to keep it stock? Have you thought about your options of upgrades other than disc brakes and exhaust?....
 

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Discussion Starter #117
Wow, I feel bad for you that's a lot of work. We all hate rust especially on these cars so don't feel out of place by any means. At that point I would have looked into a newer front end and got rid of the shock towers. But I don't know how much you are wanting to keep it stock? Have you thought about your options of upgrades other than disc brakes and exhaust?....
I know what you're saying. That mid 60's Ford suspension leaves a lot to be desired. I'm not sure why, but I'm one of those guys that leans toward factory/stock.
 

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Discussion Starter #118
OOF! Yeah that was some pretty ugly rot going on there......looks like she's in good hands though! Some guys haven't been happy withthe fit of the Dynocorn panels so it's good to hear they are working out so far.....
It was ugly rot. I thought I went over the car pretty well when I bought it, but looking back I really didn't know what to look for then. Live and learn.

I give the Dynacorns a big thumbs up. Fitment and build quality were both very good. I've since repainted the engine bay and rebuilt the suspension (pics coming) and it's all gone together nicely.
 

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what i DO NOT see is the 69 style shock tower reinforcements added (a great thing to have added ) and did you have him add the boss shock tower reinforcements on the outside?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgxL4xnTTZ4

btw get to know the guys at wccc, top notch!

also in discussing rust, you need to make sure that your fresh air vents are not rusted out
 
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