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I am new to this forum. My name is John Gunnell and I am an automotive writer and restoration shop owner. I worked for OLD CARS WEEKLY for 30 years and I now do free-lance writing. I wrote the book 55 YEARS OF MERCURY.

Last Thursday we hosted the Mercury Club at our shop in Manawa, WI during the Iola Old Car Show. While driving to the show in his '67 Cougar GT XR7 Hardtop, Brett Irick seems to have blown his engine. Brett is the manager or Ford's Dearborn Stamping Plant and he took the car to a Ford dealer. They were not a lot of help. So he had it towed to my shop.

During the barbeque he and other club members tore the motor down to the cylinder heads hoping to find a top end problem. It was great entertainment, but they did not find the problem.

We are nor trying to remove the tightly packaged heads. We got out the five head bolts on the inside and both of the first outside bolts. Can anyone tell us how to get the rest? Is this even possible with the engine in the car?

Also, any specific advice on pulling this engine if we have to. Wedo pull a lot of engines, so we don't need all the basics. But we'd like to know the tricky stuff. And we should mention that the car has A/C.

You can reach me through the forum or email me at [email protected] or visit my website at www.gunnersgreatgarage.com.
 

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John,
It's tough but doable, I use a 1/2 in. drive with a universal socket (made together) and a long breaker bar. It,s best to pull the heads and exhaust manifold out together. You could always take the motor mounts lose and jack the engine up one side at a time, but I have not had to do this. It also helps to get the shock tower braces out of the way. Hope this helps.
 

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John:

The only way I know of to remove the head bolts with the engine in the car is to unbolt the engine and transmission mounts, and physically rotate the engine in place enough to gain shock tower clearance. If its likely that the problem is in the bottom end and the shortblock will have to come out eventually, its probably not worth the trouble.
Pulling the engine, if it comes to that, is pretty straightforward. I can't think of anything especially tricky compared to other cars of similar vintage, other than the very tight clearances.

Jay

PS, I remember Brett for his work with the Cougar Club back in the early 90s. Nice guy. This sounds like the same car he had back then. Glad to hear he's hung on to it.
 
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