1967 Cougar build - Page 59
Page 59 of 61 FirstFirst ... 9 49 57 58 59 60 61 LastLast
Results 871 to 885 of 912

Thread: 1967 Cougar build

  1. #871
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    In my never ending quest for minor improvements, I decided to tackle a small issue that I've had since the start. For my stereo, I am using a little Kenwood Bluetooth amp. I made a video a while back about its features.





    The amp has a built in USB port that I have been using to charge my phone. While this worked OK, I found that the phone charged very slowly and that if I was streaming Pandora, and was listening to it through the car stereo, the charger actually did not keep up. So over the course of a long road trip, the phone battery would eventually die.


    So I went on Amazon and picked up a dual USB, 4.2amp (total) charging port. I was originally going to put it in the panel that holds the controls for the amp, but that was not going to work for various reasons. Instead, I opted to install it where the original cigarette lighter used to be inside the ash tray. This involved enlarging the hole to 1 1/8" which I did with a Dremel tool and a small carbide bit.





    The charging port also has a voltage display, which is kind of handy to reference before even starting the car.





    Nice thing about having it inside the ashtray is that it is completely invisible when not in use. Now the phone holds its charge while enjoying music on the road.


    Andrew
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

  2. #872
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    Despite the fact that I am trying to sell the car, I can't help but tinker with it.


    The other day I was doing some unrelated things (I had some trouble with the DBW going into limp mode) and I accidentally spilled a little alcohol on the hood. I noticed that the alcohol soaked into the hood and made it a lot darker, which I liked. This lead to some further experimenting. I did a portion of the hood and I rather liked the results:





    Various people have also suggested trying penetrol, so I did a portion of the roof, and I liked what it did for the paint as well.





    What prompted all of this is that before it got too cold, I wanted to do something about the roof, trunk, and other horizontal surfaces. The sun has really done a number on those areas. You can see how badly the paint is flaking on the roof:








    The trunk wasn't much better. You can also see how the clear coat is just coming off on the top of the rear quarter.





    So I grabbed a palm sander with some 80 grit and went to town. What a mess!





    I sanded the roof, trunk, hood, tops of the fenders, and basically all other areas where the clear was checkered and coming off. This was after I rinsed the car. The hood was still wet, but you can see the roof, rear quarter, and tops of the doors have been sanded. All of the light areas is where I used the sander.





    Then I started to coat the whole car with penetrol. I used a green scotch brite pad to apply it.





    Here is the whole car after everything was coated with penetrol.





    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

  3. #873
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    The sun was setting so I decided to see if I can get some decent beauty shots.








    Overall, I am pretty pleased with how it turned out. I should have done it a while ago.


    Andrew
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

  4. Remove Advertisements
    MercuryCougar.net
    Advertisements
     

  5. #874
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    60
    Posts
    13,573

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    Well, yeah, Andrew, guess it is nice, if you like that sort of thing...
    Isabel: The realization of a seven year long dream:

    Hidden Content

    Hidden Content

    Canted--Texan on the351cforum: "One of my most impressive attributes is that.......a lot of people don't like me.....or the horse I rode in on"

  6. #875
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    Today I finally got started on the electronic steering project. I've also been meaning to address another problem. All you Ford guys know how the stock pedal pivot points are made. Ford decided that it was a good idea to use some sort of pot metal bushing that was swedged into the pedal box. High mileage cars really suffer the most, but even my low mileage car had really wobbly pedals. The clutch pedal takes the majority of the load and it also holds the main support shaft for the brake pedal.


    Mustang Steve has been a round a long time and I had one of his kits for fixing this problem. He sells a nice set of parts that allow you to replace the stock bushings with roller bearings. So while I was waiting for a few more parts to arrive for the electronic steering, I figured I would go ahead and fix the wobbly pedals. Since I already pulled the steering column, it wasn't but a few more bolts and the pedal box was taken out.


    Here is the pedal box with the pot metal bushings reamed out. I used a step drill then an angle grinder.








    Then is was time for a little welding. My wife is out of town for a few days, so naturally, what better place to weld than in the kitchen. That door leads to the one car garage, which is holding my GTO, without any spare room. The welder is parked just on the other side of the wall right next to a power outlet. Perfect...





    The kit from Mustang Steve includes these little bearing sleeves that have to be welded to the pedal box. Don't judge me...it has been a long time since I have fused metal together.





    The bearings support the shaft for the clutch and the brake pedals.





    Here is the whole thing put together and assembled for good.





    #batchelorlife





    Andrew
    Last edited by andrewb70; November 6th, 2018 at 07:54 PM.
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

  7. #876
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    It was raining sideways this morning, but by the early afternoon it had stopped, so I decided to make a little more progress.


    The first thing I did was fix the attaching points of the lower column support. From the factory the column support is held in place with sheet metal screws that go into the firewall. I figured I can improve on that a little. I got an inexpensive rivnut kit on Amazon, drilled out the holes and installed 1/4" rivnuts into the firewall. Sorry for the weird picture, but I forgot to take a picture this afternoon so I took one with a flash light.





    The UPS guy showed up and brought me the lower steering shaft bearings. I ordered two kinds. I really liked the one on the left, but it turned out to be disappointing. As it turns out it isn't a bearing at all, but just a swiveling bushing. The bearing on the right will do nicely. The bore fits on my steering shaft much better and there are two set screws in the retaining collar. The three hole bearing will go back to Speedway.





    I then made a paper template of the column support, transferred it to some 16 gauge steel, and punched 4 holes in the appropriate locations. I made the holes a little bigger so there is a little bit of give and take when the column gets installed.





    I am going to wait until the column is done to mount the bearing, but it will go something like this.





    As I mentioned before, I am going to use a 1.5" ID steel collar to attach the upper column tube to the Toyota motor.





    The OD of the collar is exactly the same as the OD of column tube. I figured it was going to be a challenge butt welding that collar to the end of the tube. Now, if I only had a little lathe!!!





    I used my angle grinder with the thin wizwheelofdeath and "machined" a step in the collar. The tolerances for this sort of thing don't exactly have to be to the .00001". Turned out pretty nice!





    There is a little bit of a tapper in the step, but it fits really nicely inside the column tube. I figured this will be much easier to weld, since I won't have to worry about blowing through the thin wall of the column tube. A couple of taps with the hammer and that sleeve will fit perfectly inside the column tube.





    Tomorrow I should make some more progress. The second column will be here, hopefully around 11:00am. The weather should be good too, with only a 30% chance of rain.


    To do list:


    1. Measure and cut the upper column tube.
    2. Weld collar to tube.
    3. Figure out what to do for the upper steering shaft.
    4. Decide if I am going to add an extra mounting tab for the motor on the pedal box.


    That should keep me plenty busy tomorrow. Wish me luck!


    Andrew
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

  8. #877
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Age
    60
    Posts
    13,573

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    Nice work Andrew. I went with a Scott Drake roller bearing setup for the pedal hangar on Isabel, you just remove the pot metal bushings and the new parts go in place and are held in the hangar with external snap rings. The only rub is if you have the "wrong" type of hangar with different OD pot metal bushings. If you do and remove them, the kit will not work (ask me how I know!). The MS kit would work well in that case (but is a lot more work!). In any case, thanks, as always for sharing your adventures and projects with us!

    Regards,

    Robert
    Isabel: The realization of a seven year long dream:

    Hidden Content

    Hidden Content

    Canted--Texan on the351cforum: "One of my most impressive attributes is that.......a lot of people don't like me.....or the horse I rode in on"

  9. #878
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    Quote Originally Posted by 1969XR7Vert View Post
    .... In any case, thanks, as always for sharing your adventures and projects with us!

    Regards,

    Robert
    Thanks Robert. I may have said this before, but my goal is to have a top 5 viewed thread on this forum. I may already be there...:-)

    Andrew
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

  10. #879
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    Made some really good progress today. The UPS truck showed up right on time, but then my buddy Jack asked me if I wanted to get an early lunch. Needless to say, I didn't get started until about 1:00PM. I keep forgetting that it will get dark around 5:00PM!


    I mentioned before that the 1.5" bore collars have the same OD as the steering tube. So I attached a couple of them to the Prius motor assembly and mocked things up in the car. The motor ends up being clocked at about the 2:30 position. I wish I could move it up some more, but the wiper motor is right there. I thought about using some sort of smaller motor for the wipers, but given the time frame of this project, I will have to leave that for another day.








    It looks like it will be in the way when viewed from a low angle, but in reality, when sitting behind the wheel, the motor is barely noticeable. It also doesn't get in the way of the feet. Oh, BTW, the new bearing pedals feel amazing!!! Super smooth and just solid.

    Also, the steering ECU is going to live up against the firewall, over in the corner where the dimmer switch lives. You can sort of see the spot in the picture above.





    With the Prius motor mounted, I was able to take some measurements. I had to take into account the collar that I machined yesterday, etc...etc...I expanded the slot a little so the set screw would slide in.





    Here is the cut upper tube.





    I needed it to be 14.5" total, with the turn signal portion of the column attached.





    Then came the scary part. I knew that when I cut the column tube, it wasn't going to be perfectly square. I also knew that the collar "machine" job wasn't perfect either. With that said, I had to make sure that the collar was square to the tube. I actually messed up the first time. This was my second attempt and I think I got it good enough for what this is.





    Rotatesd 90 degrees.





    With the tube tacked to the collar, it was time to mock it up in the car, one more time. The length was perfect and the stock upper column support fits perfectly with the anti-rotation tab fitting in its slot.





    Continued...
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

  11. #880
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    Then came the paralysis by analysis. As I mentioned earlier, my plan was to make a shaft on the output side of the motor and pass it through a bearing that was to be mounted to a plate (I made this plate yesterday!) in the location where the stock lower column support attaches. As I was looking at the mounted motor and feeling how much it rocked up and down, I just wasn't comfortable with my original plan. I know people have done exactly that and the steering shaft will of course help to stabilize the upper column, but I just didn't feel comfortable with it.


    The output shaft has a lot of torque on it already and then stressing it in other directions to stabilize the whole column seems like a big ask for a 3/4" shaft. I decided that I was going to build a lower tube. Having a lower tube that attaches to the motor will put the loads of holding the column rigid on the tubes, and allowing the shaft to take only the forces of steering the car.


    I was at Tractor Supply yesterday, buying some hardware. However, I looked all around the store just to see what they have. I remembered seeing some bearing flanges so I went back today with some measurements in hand. I ended up buying these (came in a pack of two). The size was right and they are stamped out of 14 gauge material. Plenty sturdy for this project.









    What I needed to do next was to get them concentric with the output shaft. I ended up using the bearing from the firewall mount and wrapping it in making tape to make up for the diameter difference. The ID of the bearing fit the output shaft of the steering motor perfectly and I kept it in place with a couple of set screws that are on the bearing collar.









    If I was This Old Tony (from YouTube), I would have machined a perfect alignment tool for the job, but I am working in my kitchen FFS...


    I then took the lower bearing from my old column. This part is obviously not stock but came from TCP as part of their rack and pinion kit. At this point, the lower tube is not cut to length.









    You can also see that I have the steering shaft installed and it is attached to the coupler that matches the splines of the Toyota motor and transitions to 3/4" smooth bore. I then pushed the steering shaft and the tube up against the flange. The flange has a smooth tapper and the tube has the factory square cut. This forced the tube to be concentric and square.














    Then I fired up the welder and made some tacks around the circumference of the tube. Yes, I forgot to grind the zinc platting off the flange. Yes, there were fumes...pray for me....please...









    After tacking the tube to the flange, I mode holes in the flange for attaching hardware and installed the whole thing, passing the lower tube through the lower column support and into the engine bay. I don't have pictures of this because it was almost dark out. With the column installed, I mocked up the intermediate shaft from the rack, and laid out the right length for the lower column tube. Here is the final lower tube, cut to length.









    There will be a total of 3 bolts that hold the lower tube to the motor assembly. That is all the holes that are driller and tapped in the motor casting. There is another hole that is marked, but not fully drilled or tapped. I thought about drilling and tapping this location, but I figured the 3 bolts are plenty, even though they are not symmetrically located.









    And here we have it; the whole column, sans the upper portion. The upper shaft is the stock Toyota shaft. This needs to be cut and mated to the Cougar upper shaft.









    Tomorrows task are:


    1. Finalize the lower shaft.
    2. Complete the upper shaft
    3. Quick strip and paint the upper column in parchment color and lower column in black.
    4. Install column for good.
    5. Wiring and testing!


    If you like what you're reading, please subscribe to my YouTube channel. I will have videos of all this uploaded next week.


    Andrew
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

  12. #881
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Camano Island WA.
    Age
    66
    Posts
    4,047
    Blog Entries
    2

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    Looking good Andrew.
    Hidden Content
    See ya on the hiways, Neal
    1970 XR-7 Hard top White & Ginger. 351W "Ginger"
    1970 XR-7 convertible Blue & Black 351C 4V
    1971 XR-7 Bright Blue with Blue Up beat interior
    1970 Standard 428CJ Competition Yellow The New Money Pit.
    2002 Miata LS Emerald Mica Daily driver.
    2006 Ranger Sonic Blue, 4.0 V6 5 speed AOD The work force.
    If it ain't broken, Modify it!
    Hidden Content Hidden Content

  13. #882
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    Today was a miserable looking day. It was raining all morning and I wasn't able to get as much done as I wanted, but I made solid progress.


    The gentleman that first documented the Toyota Prius installation had a couple of suggestions as to how to make the upper shaft. Here is what he did on his Falcon:








    I didn't see anything wrong with how he did it, but there is one problem, I don't have a lathe. Even if I did, instead of turning down the Falcon shaft, I would have bored out the Toyota stub to .750" to accept the Falcon shaft. Anyway, doesn't matter, no lathe.


    Keep in mind, the Toyota stub has internal splines on the left side of the shaft. I made my first cut where he suggested, and as he noted a stock .750" shaft doesn't fit. However, notice that the Toyota stub has a little bulge, so if a cut can be made a little further to the right of where he made his cut, the ID gets bigger. So I took my wizwheelofdeath and cut off about 1/8" off the Toyota stub.





    I was getting close now. Making that second cut got me really close to .750", so from here on out, I snuck up on it with a file. I wanted the Cougar shaft to fit snugly into the Toyota stub.





    I cut the Cougar shaft a little long, so I can trim it exactly to the right length later. Here you can see the Cougar shaft fitting snugly into the Toyota stub.





    You can also see by the silver mark, how far the Cougar shaft slides into the Toyota stub. This is important, because the Cougar shaft bottoms out on a taper that is inside the Toyota stub.





    By having a tight fit at the opening of the stub and then having the shaft bottom out into a snug taper, assures that the two shafts are concentric to each other. This is obviously important, because we want as straight of a shaft as possible.


    The final length of the Toyota stub ended up being right at 5.100"





    Now it was time to cut the Cougar shaft to length. Again, a lathe would be the perfect way to do it, but no lathe. I had purchased a few .750" ID collar at Tractor Supply (officially my new favorite store) and I used one of them as a guide for my whizwheelofdeath.





    This worked very well and gave a pretty square cut. The other thing that I wanted to do was stake the two shafts together. My welding is OK, but this is pretty critical hardware. So I drilled a 1/4" hole through both the Toyota stub and the Cougar shaft.


    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

  14. #883
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    I then took a 1/4" grade 8 bolt and provided a mechanical pin that holds both shafts together. Then I cut the bolt and welded it in.





    Then I welded the Toyota stub to the Cougar shaft.





    The lower shaft is pretty straight forward. I used a Burgeson adapter with the Toyota spline on one side and a .750" smooth bore on the other side. Here I did exactly the same thing. Drilled a hole through the adapter and the shaft, 1/4" grade 8 bolt, welded bolt, then welded shaft to adapter.





    Here is the final upper shaft. It ended up being 13 5/16" overall length. Keep in mind there is some wiggle room here because the left side of the shaft is splined. I made it as long as possible to engage those splined fully. The collar is there to keep the steering shaft from pulling out the top and it bottoms against the upper portion of the column. I really don't see this being an issue, because the splines on the Toyota stub fit really, really tightly on the input shaft of the motor, but I wanted a positive stop there anyway.





    With the shaft installed and the upper tube attached you can see that the shaft length is perfect. You can see the groove for a circlip just above the stock upper bearing.





    This is the lower shaft installed on the output side of the Toyota motor.





    I ground flats on the end of the lower shaft (this was harder than it seemed) to mate with the u-joints for the intermediate shaft.





    And here it is, fully assembled and ready for a coat of paint tomorrow.





    The weather is supposed to be sunny tomorrow, so I am going to throw this thing in the car ASAP, get it temporarily wired up, and see if it actually works.


    Andrew
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

  15. #884
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    This morning it was in the mid 30s, but I managed to get outside and get some work done. My wife was on her way home, so the clock was ticking!


    The big news is that IT WORKS! I hooked up the temporary wiring, turned on the key and I was rewarded with one hand steering. Now for some details, mostly in words, but a few pictures.


    If you've been following this build, you might remember that I had some electrical problems when moving to Alabama. The issue was ultimately traced to a really crapy inline fuse holder. At that time I fixed the problem by installing a Delphi power distribution center under the hood. These are fairly common parts in 90s GM vehicles, and all of the miscellaneous parts can still be sourced from Mouser, and other vendors. Here is what it looks like.





    On the bottom you can see the 4 gauge wire attaching to the central bus bar and power is fed to the fuses on the right. The fuses on the left are "duds" are are meant strictly as spares. The top fuse is what feeds a big relay under my dash that powers the Holley dash and a few other components. When I installed these parts, I knew that I was eventually going to do the EPS swap, so I ran extra wires from under the hood to under the dash. Position number two on the right is what powers the EPS. I also "stole" one of the other wires and used it as a ground, which I attached to the front of the cylinder head.


    That took care of the power feeds, but the Toyota ECU also requires a "turn on" 12+ signal wire. Here is the schematic for the necessary connections:





    To make everything work seamlessly, I decided that I was going to integrate the "turn on" circuit through the Holley Dominator ECU. I created a 12+ output and programmed it to turn at temperature above -30 degrees. This assures that the output is triggered during any realistic conditions. In other words, as soon as the ECU boots up (this takes about 5 seconds) the EPS is on.


    I also added a wire from the Dominator to the Toyota ECU for a speed signal. As of right now, this feature will not be enabled but I will post more on this later. For now, the EPS will operate in "failsafe mode" and give a constant level of assist.


    Then it was time to make everything pretty. I know this sounds weird given the patina look of my Cougar, but I couldn't put the raw metal column back in the car. Scott Drake makes a rattle can paint to match the Ford 'parchment" color, which is what my Cougar is. I painted the upper portion of the column in that color and the lower portion was painted black. For now I left the motor assembly "natural" but I may end up painting all of it black as well.





    The last bit of details is the wiring for the turn signals. On Mustangs these wires are external to the column and have a little snap in cover. On Cougars, the wires are internal to the column and exit under the dash. Since I now have a lot of things occupying the space inside the upper tube the wires have to be external of the column tube. To make the 10 wires more presentable, I loomed them in an expanding covering.





    That's about it for today. Tomorrow the weather is supposed to stay nice, so I will assemble everything and take it down the road for the first time with power steering.


    Andrew
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

  16. #885
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    The Druid City
    Posts
    942

    Re: 1967 Cougar build

    The painting turned out pretty well. I let everything dry overnight inside the house and it was ready to go in the morning.





    I decided that for now I was going to leave off the little cone shaped part of the upper column. Here you can see how the turn signal switch wiring is routed.





    A while back I converted the column wiring connector to a Metripack GT280 connector.





    This is the stock Ford connector.





    Here she is, painted and ready to be installed for good. You can also see the intermediate shaft in this picture.





    The ECU had all sorts of weirdly shaped bracket on it that I whizwheelofdeath off. It fits nicely just above the dimmer switch and the wiring comes in from the top.





    I am glad I got rid of those sheet metal screws for the lower column support clamp.





    A while back a friend of mine gave me this stuff. He swears by it.





    I have not had a chance to use it yet, but I figured this was an appropriate occasion. This stuff is white and doesn't get EVERYWHERE like the silver stuff.





    Mounted my Holley dash and almost ready for the first drive.





    Driving impressions to come in a bit...


    Andrew
    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content
    Instagram @projectgattago

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Similar Threads

    1. 1967 Cougar Auto-x/ Street terrorizer build
      By Defined Auto in forum High Performance
      Replies: 15
      Last Post: March 11th, 2014, 06:58 AM
    2. 71 Cougar Build
      By badkitty in forum Cougar Community Discussion
      Replies: 6
      Last Post: May 19th, 2013, 08:09 AM
    3. 67 Cougar Build
      By SavantJK in forum Cougar Community Discussion
      Replies: 8
      Last Post: October 30th, 2011, 05:55 PM
    4. 1967-68 Cougar owners: What is your favorite feature of the 1967-68 Cougar?
      By cougarnewbie in forum Cougar Community Discussion
      Replies: 34
      Last Post: February 22nd, 2006, 09:39 PM
    5. Why they are going to build a new Cougar
      By xr7g428 in forum Cougar Community Discussion
      Replies: 24
      Last Post: July 29th, 2005, 11:42 AM

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •