??? about powder coating headlight doors [Archive] - Classic Cougar Forums

: ??? about powder coating headlight doors



Stangwires
November 7th, 2009, 01:58 AM
Somewhere in these forums, I had read that it was necessary to build some kind of a device that would keep the headlight doors from warping while being powder coated. Is this really necessary? If so, do you have any pictures of it?

cougarrand
November 7th, 2009, 05:35 AM
You need to do something, I had to replace the doors on my 68 because they warped while being powder coated.
Randy Feuillerat

rocket
November 7th, 2009, 01:31 PM
dont even try it i had a set melted all there was left was blobs of what use to be mint parts

Stangwires
November 7th, 2009, 07:03 PM
Man, must be a lot of differences in the temperature that different places use. I've never heard of headlights turning into blobs before. At least I know that they are serious when they talk about warpage.

69XR7RestoMod
November 7th, 2009, 09:51 PM
My powder coater said not to bring in anything that couldn't stand 400 degrees for an hour.

Al Bundy
November 8th, 2009, 05:58 AM
From what I've read I thought it only took about ten minutes for the coating to flow properly. I guess it depends on the exact material being used.

I guess my question would be "How the hell am I supposed to know what will take 400 degrees for an hour?" :confused:

Jan Ove
November 8th, 2009, 06:31 AM
From what I've read I thought it only took about ten minutes for the coating to flow properly. I guess it depends on the exact material being used.

You're right about it only takes some minutes for the coating to flow properly, it's the baking to get the paint to cure/harden properly that takes some time on high temp

69XR7RestoMod
November 8th, 2009, 06:36 AM
From what I've read I thought it only took about ten minutes for the coating to flow properly. I guess it depends on the exact material being used.

I guess my question would be "How the hell am I supposed to know what will take 400 degrees for an hour?" :confused:

Put the part in your home oven and bake a 400 for an hour, at least this way if the part won't hold up you've saved yourself a trip to the powder coater and a couple of $ :)

Seriously - most anything that is on the car and made from cast or stamped steel will be fine. Just stay away from the pot metal stuff.

Al Bundy
November 8th, 2009, 06:50 AM
Put the part in your home oven and bake a 400 for an hour, at least this way if the part won't hold up you've saved yourself a trip to the powder coater and a couple of $ :)

Seriously - most anything that is on the car and made from cast or stamped steel will be fine. Just stay away from the pot metal stuff.

I could only imagine my wife's reaction if I melted a headlight door in the oven. It might be worth it just to tape it and post it online. :realmad:

Al Bundy
November 8th, 2009, 08:05 AM
After nosing around online I came across a new low temperature powder resin. It's called Uralac EasyCure made by DSM. Haven't been able to find any pictures of finished product, but I'll keep looking. If anyone has any info about it please share.

doctordesoto
November 8th, 2009, 11:18 AM
you should build a frame to hold the main grill assy during coat/oven process--you moght get away hanging the assy by 6 or more special length hooks to keep them from distorting.we soda blasted the pieces to remove all paint.the parts were hung face down.after spraying the semi-gloss powder , we used an index finger to wipe off the powder on the chrome face only . this gives a masked look without any harsh mask lines.the h/l doors turned out great but the large grill pieces and taillight bezels warped(i did not knopw about supporting at this time) i took a propane torch and warmed the pieces from the rear an was able to tweek the parts to fit without messing up the p-coat--i'd do it again in a flash--but with a support frame
doctordesoto

Copy Cat
November 8th, 2009, 12:13 PM
Look for a shop that specializes in coating pot metal and plastics. They have different techniques to deal with this. Pre-heating, baking longer at lower temperatures and others. My biggest problem is finding the correct color. It's either too glossy or too flat to my eye.

Stangwires
November 8th, 2009, 04:38 PM
you should build a frame to hold the main grill assy during coat/oven process--you moght get away hanging the assy by 6 or more special length hooks to keep them from distorting.we soda blasted the pieces to remove all paint.the parts were hung face down.after spraying the semi-gloss powder , we used an index finger to wipe off the powder on the chrome face only . this gives a masked look without any harsh mask lines.the h/l doors turned out great but the large grill pieces and taillight bezels warped(i did not knopw about supporting at this time) i took a propane torch and warmed the pieces from the rear an was able to tweek the parts to fit without messing up the p-coat--i'd do it again in a flash--but with a support frame
doctordesoto


How did you build the frame?

Travis
November 9th, 2009, 03:43 PM
Coating pot metal sucks we try to steer clear of it when we can. If you absolutely have to powdercoat these parts they make a low cure coating in about any color imaginable. These coatings generally cure in the 300-350 range for 15min. Also for exterior UV bombarded parts stay away from epoxy powders and use poly or a poly blend like TGIC.

SeanD
November 10th, 2009, 12:42 PM
With all the hassle, why not just paint them? Mine are painted, it cost almost nothing, and I have a hard time believing that powder coating would turn out any better.

Cougar-67
November 10th, 2009, 02:40 PM
I found a local powder coating company that handles industrial-sized coating jobs. The guy there at Armour Coatings (Germantown, WI) ruined my long pieces--the ones that all other parts are bolted onto, so for the $50 to pick up replacement parts of eBay, he powder coated all eight pieces for free, including the buckets. The doors themselves were fine, however. Don't think they'll be doing that anytime soon, but just wanted to share. I'll try to post a few pics by the weekend (need new digital camera battery).

They also did my GT-style rims for $250 (five), and only hope they don't turn to crap after my first drive. My '67 has been out of commission for 1 1/2 years, and I finally welded in place the replacement cowling pieces.