1969 hideaway headlight question [Archive] - Classic Cougar Forums

: 1969 hideaway headlight question



RayH
February 2nd, 2012, 06:44 PM
Ok guys, I recently purchased a 1969 cougar. Headlights would not stay closed longer than 24 hours. Replaced the vacuum valve under the hood and now they stay closed about three days. Question is can the headlight switch be a problem or is it the vacuum operated door opener? I have a new switch and plan to change it out but is there anything else I should replace other than the hoses?

1969XR7Vert
February 2nd, 2012, 08:09 PM
Ray,

The vacuum motor would be the likely problem.

RayH
February 2nd, 2012, 08:36 PM
Thats what I kinda figured. This car is dollaring me to death:bloated:

70COUGAR428
February 2nd, 2012, 09:19 PM
Ray, Maybe if you have on your air lines hoses Plasic adapters and Plasic shut off that the hoses connect too. they can get cracks.. Dont know if 1969 and 1970 are all that different. Sweet Ride what i can see post some pictures if you can.

jgolding
February 2nd, 2012, 09:51 PM
A cheap fix is to disconnect the springs on the headlight doors. The headlight doors will stay closed and they will still open but alittle slower. I have been operating my headlights light this on my Eliminator for 20 years.

a70eliminator
February 3rd, 2012, 05:24 PM
24 hrs is acceptable, 3 days is excellent for 69-70 systems with the failsafe spring, mine seeps open after about 2 days sitting.

towcat
February 3rd, 2012, 05:59 PM
If the system is sealed properly, they should stay closed indefinitely.

1969XR7Vert
February 3rd, 2012, 07:04 PM
Ray,

The vacuum motor would be the likely problem.

Just swapped my fixed up original with a fixed up replacement (that I bought as a wee lad), so far two days and doors still down, springs are in place.

RayH
February 3rd, 2012, 08:56 PM
Removing the springs did not allow the doors to open. Man those springs are a pain in the arse to get back on.

a70eliminator
February 4th, 2012, 02:32 PM
If the system is sealed properly, they should stay closed indefinitely.
In the perfect world I would agree, although.
This system has 18 barbed hose connections, 4 rubber diaphragm seals, an external shaft seal, the switching valve, connectors with o-rings, ect. The system is a far cry from being hermetically sealed which is what it would take to hold indefinate vacuum.
I read in one of the 1970 Ford service manuals (preliminary manual) a service test being three complate cycles over an ?hr period, can't remeber exactly how it was worded but a certain leakdown rate is expected.

BarneyFife
February 4th, 2012, 04:22 PM
In the perfect world I would agree, although.
This system has 18 barbed hose connections, 4 rubber diaphragm seals, an external shaft seal, the switching valve, connectors with o-rings, ect. The system is a far cry from being hermetically sealed which is what it would take to hold indefinate vacuum.
I read in one of the 1970 Ford service manuals (preliminary manual) a service test being three complate cycles over an ?hr period, can't remeber exactly how it was worded but a certain leakdown rate is expected.
the owners manual of my 68 even says its normal for the headlights to open after sitting for a while...and says they will close on their own when the engine is started. so, even new, Ford expected leaks.

towcat
February 5th, 2012, 10:29 AM
The headlights on a 68 will never open on their own, they have no counter springs like the 69/70. With a little effort, these systems can be sealed. And a70eliminator_ if people would start by cutting off the first 1/2 in. of hose on all 18 barbed fittings and using a little vacuum grease, they would eliminate 80% of their leaks, The main reason people have leaks is because they don't know how to check each device for leaks. I would be glad to write up a summary of how to do this.